Major League Baseball has no idea what it's doing with the A's

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It’s been sixteen months since Bud Selig announced the formation of a committee to study the Athletics’ stadium situation. Despite the fact that a focused task force could probably thoroughly analyze the situation and publish a glossy report on the matter in the space of a week with time left over for a happy hour on Friday, there is still no report from Bud’s experts. And no hint of when one will come out.

This has irked San Jose mayor Chuck Reed, who has wanted to put a stadium proposal on the fall ballot. Major League Baseball has told him not to, however, probably for fear that it will destroy the delicate alchemy in which Bud’s committee is engaged. Break their vacuum tubes and slide rules and whatnot.

Last week Reed said “screw it,” and announced that this fall’s ballot will have the stadium measure. Yesterday Major League Baseball’s Bob DuPuy told Reed that baseball would pay for the campaign.  To sum up:

  • Bud Selig’s college roommate/A’s owner Lew Wolf has repeatedly slammed Oakland and has said he wants to go to San Jose; and
  • San Jose’s mayor wants the A’s; and
  • Major League Baseball is going to fund the campaign for the ballot measure that will make moving the A’s to San Jose possible; but
  • Major League Baseball won’t simply say that the A’s are going to San Jose.

I imagine the reason for that last part is that baseball is afraid of the Giants’ territorial claim, but everything else they’re doing is consistent with baseball’s interest in disregarding it. Which they should do, because carving up the nation in arbitrary territories is stupid, anti-competitive and, in the long run, bad for business.  We know it would be outrageously difficult for a third team to relocate to New York now, but if it had happened 20 years ago as the stadium and RSN boom was getting underway, they’d be swimming in it now.

Grow a pair, Bud. Call the Giants on their bluff. If it gets ugly, it gets ugly, but the most you have to lose is an archaic system that is going to prevent your successor from helping baseball propel itself into the 21st century.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.