Rhode Island Gubernatorial candidate questions Schilling's bloody sock

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Remember kids, you can’t spell “gubernatorial” without “guber!”

Former U.S. Sen. Lincoln Chafee is questioning whether Boston Red Sox great Curt Schilling faked his bloody sock in Game 6 of the 2004 AL championship series . . . Chafee said he doesn’t know if he trusts Schilling, and incorrectly said
Schilling’s own teammates questioned whether Schilling faked his bloody
sock.

The background here is that Schilling’s video game company just got a $75 million loan guarantee from a State of Rhode Island development fund and Chafee is questioning it. Such loan guarantees may or may not be bad policy, but going after Red Sox World Series heroes when you’re running for office in New England is unquestionably bad politics.

Personally speaking I think Schilling would have to be about 10,000 times the self-promoter he usually shows at his worst moments to have actually faked the bloody sock. I don’t think anyone is that pathological, and despite some random whispers about it here or there I’m simply not buying the conspiracy theories. It’s been nearly six years. If someone had any real dirt on that, they would have said so already.

But hey, it’s modern politics. Maybe Chafee has done some serious polling regarding how attacking Schilling plays.  If so, and if it works out for him, it may open up a whole new world for baseball-related political consulting.  I could probably make a fortune doing that.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.