A's lock up catcher Kurt Suzuki through 2013

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The A’s on Friday signed popular catcher Kurt Suzuki to a four-year contract worth a guaranteed $16.25 million, according to the San Francisco Chronicle’s Susan Slusser.
The new deal replaces the one-year, $420,000 contract Suzuki signed prior to 2010. He would have been eligible for arbitration for the first time in the offseason. Now all three of his arbitration years are spoken for, and there’s a vesting option for 2014, his first year of free agency, that could make the deal worth $25 million-$26 million.
It seems like a pretty high price for the A’s to pay considering Suzuki’s modest numbers. He did drive in 88 runs last year, but he’s not going to match that number this season after spending time on the DL in May with a strained intercostal muscle. He finished with OPSs of 716 and 734 in his two full seasons, and he’s at 724 at the moment.
That only scratches the surface of Suzuki’s value to the team, though. While he did miss time this season, he was among the major league leaders in catching 141 games in 2008 and 135 in 2009. He’s regarded as an above average defender, particularly when it comes to calling games. And, at age 26, he figures to remain a very solid player for the duration of the deal.
So, he’s quite likely to be worth his salaries under the terms of the extension. Whether he would have done better in arbitration is another matter. Given his unspectacular batting averages and home run totals, he certainly wasn’t going to break the bank, and the A’s might have been able to save some money by going year to year with him.
However, that’s not a risk they were willing to take. At least this does settle the matter of whether Suzuki will be traded. He was frequently asked about, though never offered around, and now that he’s locked up, his name figures to go absent from the rumor mill for at least the next year and a half.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.