Angels' trade for Alberto Callaspo makes Brandon Wood the odd man out, even if GM won't admit it

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Ben Bolch of the Los Angeles Times described Angels general manager Tony Reagins as “defiant” when asked if yesterday’s trade for Alberto Callaspo will equal less of an opportunity for Brandon Wood.

It doesn’t affect Brandon’s future in any way. It doesn’t. We’re not thinking down that path right now. We’re not going to make any decisions and give up on Brandon Wood. He’s been a part of this organization and he’s a good player. Hopefully, we can get him going in the right direction.

Even before the trade Wood had started just seven of the past 22 games and barring an injury or another trade there’s just no place for him in the Angels’ lineup. And as Bolch points out, Callaspo is 27 years old and under the Angels’ control through 2013, while Maicer Izturis is signed through 2012.
I’ve been critical of the Angels in the past because they avoided giving Wood an extended opportunity to play every day, but at this point even his short stints of sporadic starts add up to 420 career plate appearances and he’s simply been dreadful, hitting .181 with a .206 on-base percentage, .275 slugging percentage, and ghastly 126/11 K/BB ratio.
At this point a fresh start for Wood would probably be best for everyone involved, although the longtime top prospect’s stock has plummeted to the point that the Angels probably couldn’t even get any significant value for him in a trade.

If the Tigers are sub-.500 at the end of June it’ll be fire sale time

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Jon Morosi reports that that the Detroit Tigers will make all veterans available via trade if they’re still under .500 by the end of June.

This was the position they entered the offseason with — everyone is available! — but they ended up gearing up for one more push with the core of veterans they currently employ. It was not a bad move, I don’t think. With the exception of the Indians, the AL Central is mostly down, or at least appeared to be over the winter, with the Royals in decline and the Twins and White Sox seemingly a few years away from contention. The Twins, however, have been fantastic and the Tigers have mostly underachieved.

So we’re back to this. Which veterans the Tigers can reasonably unload, however, is an open question. J.D. Martinez is in his walk year, so while tradable, he may not bring back a big return. Guys like Justin Upton, Justin Verlander and Miguel Cabrera either have very large contracts or no-trade protection.

The end of June is still a while from now, of course, and while the Tigers are under .500, they’re only 4.5 games behind the Twins. But they had better turn it around or else it sounds like the front office is going to turn the page.

Must-Click Link: Remembering Eddie Grant the first major leaguer to die in combat

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As you get ready for Memorial Day weekend and whatever it entails for you and yours, take some time to read an excellent article from Mike Bates over at The Hardball Times.

The article is about Eddie Grant. You probably never heard of him. He was a journeyman infielder — often a backup — from 1905 through 1915. If you have heard of him, it was likely not for his baseball exploits, however: it was because he was the first active baseball player to die in combat, killed in the Battle of the Argonne Forest in October 1915.

Michael tells us about more than Grant’s death, however. He provides a great overview of his life and career. And notes that Grant didn’t even have to go to war if he didn’t want to. He was 34, had the chance to coach or manage and had a law degree and the potential to make a lot of money following his baseball career. He volunteered, however, for both patriotic and personal reasons. And it cost him his life.

Must-read stuff indeed. Especially this weekend.