Angels' trade for Alberto Callaspo makes Brandon Wood the odd man out, even if GM won't admit it

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Ben Bolch of the Los Angeles Times described Angels general manager Tony Reagins as “defiant” when asked if yesterday’s trade for Alberto Callaspo will equal less of an opportunity for Brandon Wood.

It doesn’t affect Brandon’s future in any way. It doesn’t. We’re not thinking down that path right now. We’re not going to make any decisions and give up on Brandon Wood. He’s been a part of this organization and he’s a good player. Hopefully, we can get him going in the right direction.

Even before the trade Wood had started just seven of the past 22 games and barring an injury or another trade there’s just no place for him in the Angels’ lineup. And as Bolch points out, Callaspo is 27 years old and under the Angels’ control through 2013, while Maicer Izturis is signed through 2012.
I’ve been critical of the Angels in the past because they avoided giving Wood an extended opportunity to play every day, but at this point even his short stints of sporadic starts add up to 420 career plate appearances and he’s simply been dreadful, hitting .181 with a .206 on-base percentage, .275 slugging percentage, and ghastly 126/11 K/BB ratio.
At this point a fresh start for Wood would probably be best for everyone involved, although the longtime top prospect’s stock has plummeted to the point that the Angels probably couldn’t even get any significant value for him in a trade.

Report: Momentum in talks between Mariners, Jon Jay

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MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports that there is some momentum in talks between the Mariners and free agent outfielder Jon Jay.

Jay, 32, hit .296/.374/.375 in 433 plate appearances with the Cubs last season, which is adequate. He’s heralded more for his defense and his ability to play all three outfield spots.

The Mariners are losing center fielder Jarrod Dyson to free agency and likely don’t want to rely on Guillermo Heredia next season, hence the interest in Jay. The free agent class for center fielders is otherwise relatively weak.