The Mattingly mound visit: MLB says the umps were wrong; umps disagree

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I’ll admit that I was rather confused about the Don Mattingly mound visit thing the other night.  After my initial post yesterday I was mostly persuaded by others that even if the umpires were following the letter of the rule regarding Mattingly making two mound visits, they weren’t following the spirit of the rule because Donnie Baseball wasn’t trying to either waste time or play games with matchups or whatever reason managers aren’t allowed to make two visits before changing the pitcher.

But it seems I wasn’t even right that the umpires were following the letter of the rule. Major League Baseball said otherwise yesterday:

Because Mattingly disobeyed the umpire’s warning, the rule calls for
Mattingly to be ejected and for Jonathan Broxton to face the next
batter, then be removed. MLB has told the umpires this interpretation
was the correct one.

Instead, the umpires ruled that Broxton had to be removed immediately.
Mattingly brought in George Sherrill, who didn’t have a chance to warm
up in the bullpen.

To be fair to the umps, it was a highly unusual situation regarding a less-than-crystal-clear rule and they had Bruce Bochy yelling at them about it all while they tried to work through it.  Even if they were ultimately wrong about it I’m willing to cut some slack under the “everyone’s human” rule.

Not that this clears anything up:

Crew chief Tim McClelland did not agree with MLB’s interpretation.

“I am not of the opinion [that’s the way the rule should have been
applied],” McClelland said. “The league is of that opinion. It’s a
difference of opinion in a situation that’s not covered.”

I think it’s safe to say that if, more than a day later, the umps, the league and parties involved still can’t agree on what should have happened, we’re dealing with a rule that desperately needs an overhaul.

Anthony Rendon is open to an extension with the Nationals

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Third baseman Anthony Rendon is reportedly open to a contract extension with the Nationals, Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post said Sunday. Rendon told reporters that he didn’t know if agent Scott Boras would discuss an extension with the club, contrary to previous reports confirming the two had already started that conversation.

Rendon, 27, is coming off of his best career year to date. He finished the 2017 season batting .301/.403/.533 with 25 home runs and 100 RBI through 605 plate appearances, good enough to earn him sixth place in NL MVP voting. He made his third postseason appearance after helping Nationals through the National League Division Series, and contributed a pair of extra-base hits before the team was eliminated by the Cubs in Game 5.

Rendon is still arbitration-eligible through 2019, but stands to receive a hefty payday once he enters free agency in 2020. While it stands to reason that the Nats would want to lock up a player who contributed a whopping 6.9 fWAR last year, making him the most valuable player on their roster, an extension appeals to Rendon as well. “Why not stay with one organization?” he said Sunday. The 2018 season will be his sixth with the team.