Marlon Byrd is still taking whatever Victor Conte gives him

3 Comments

I shook my head last year when Yahoo! first reported the relationship between Marlon Byrd and former BALCO bad boy and “cream” and “clear” creator Victor Conte. The upshot: Conte supplies Byrd with all manner of supplements, the identity and nature of which Byrd has only the vaguest notions. Byrd was then and remains today the only Major League Baseball player who works with Conte.

Yahoo!’s Steve Henson updates the story today and not much has changed.  We do learn, however, that after last year’s story came out Major League Baseball went ballistic at one of its players working with Conte and demanded a meeting with Byrd over it all.  That never happened, apparently because MLB realized that Byrd (a) hadn’t failed any drug tests; (b) has always been a good baseball citizen; and (c) was still an American citizen with some freakin’ rights, dadgummit.

My head-shaking over it all wasn’t (and still isn’t) inspired the same thing that sparked Major League Baseball’s ire — the mere association with Conte — my thing was Byrd’s seemingly total trust in the guy. In last year’s story Byrd said he never even asks what’s in the supplements he’s given by Conte, and there is no indication in today’s article that he’s acquired any additional curiosity.

And, hell, now that I think about it, maybe it’s better that he’s going through Conte than diving into the supplement world himself. As we’ve learned in recent years, a large number of over-the-counter supplements contained banned substances, many of which aren’t even listed on the label. It would be easy for someone to mess up and take a banned substance. At least Conte has (a) expertise; and (b) the motive to grow his business from its post-BALCO ashes. He knows that if one of his athletes test positive for something he’s beyond ruined.

But even if I don’t subscribe to the idea of guilt by association, it is rather amazing to me that a ballplayer would associate with Conte in this day and age.  I like Byrd so I hope it doesn’t burn him, but man, I don’t know that I’d take that chance.   

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

Stacy Revere/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.