Bengie Molina hits for cycle, creates rip in time-space continuum


We have witnessed many unlikely events already this season — Stephen Strasburg striking out 14 in his major league debut, four no-hitters, two perfect games, one almost perfect game, the first-place San Diego Padres and the National League actually winning an All-Star Game — but I can say without hesitation that Bengie Molina’s cycle against the Red Sox on Friday night was the most improbable of them all.

Molina was already 3-for-3 with a single, a double and a go-ahead grand slam when he came up to the plate in the top of the eighth inning. That’s a great night by anybody’s standards, but Molina wasn’t done. He proceeded to crank a long drive to distant center field, not far from where he hit his grand slam in the fifth inning. After the ball ricocheted off Eric Patterson’s glove and into Fenway’s famous nook in right center field, the notoriously slow-footed Molina legged out his sixth career triple and successfully completed the first cycle by a catcher since Chad Moeller on April 27, 2004.

Even more incredible, Molina is the eighth player and the first catcher to hit a grand slam and complete the cycle in the same game. It happened.

If you haven’t seen it already, I recommend watching the video footage here.

Here’s what Molina told T.R. Sullivan of

“This means a lot,” Molina said. “I’m not a stats guy; everybody who
knows me knows that. That’s an individual thing, but being one of the
slowest guys in the world, and being criticized for it all my career, to
be able to do something like that really makes me feel good.”

The fact that Molina was forced to leave the game immediately after the triple with a tight right quadriceps is rather appropriate. It’s like he was punished for messing with the cosmos or something.

CC Sabathia checking into alcohol rehab center

sabathia getty

This is totally unexpected and definitely unfortunate: The New York Yankees just released a statement from CC Sabathia saying that he is checking himself into alcohol rehabilitation center.

There will no doubt be additional details and reporting going forward, but this is all we have at the moment.

Sabathia, who was involved in a relatively minor incident outside a nightclub back in August, has battled injuries and ineffectiveness for the past three seasons but has, in his last few starts, shown himself to be effective, even if he’s not to the level he once was. And, should the Yankees advance past the Wild Card game, one would have assumed that the Yankees would’ve been counting on him for the playoff rotation.

Now, however, that seems both doubtful and completely superfluous. Here’s hoping Sabathia deals with whatever problems he’s facing and comes out healthy on the other end.

Diamondbacks fire pitching coach Mike Harkey

Oliver Perez, Mike Harkey
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Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic reports that the Diamondbacks have fired pitching coach Mike Harkey following a season in which the staff ranked ninth among NL teams in runs allowed.

That actually represents a big improvement from last season, when the Diamondbacks allowed the second-most runs in the league in Harkey’s first year as pitching coach, but the Tony La Russa-led front office has decided to make a change.

Prior to joining the Diamondbacks two offseasons ago Harkey served as the Yankees’ bullpen coach from 2008-2013. He pitched eight seasons in the majors.