Shin-Soo Choo could return from DL next week

1 Comment

It wasn’t too long ago that we were thinking Shin-Soo Choo could need surgery on his thumb. Now, according to Anthony Castrovince of MLB.com, it appears that he could be back in the lineup by the end of next week.

Choo took some soft-toss Thursday and is scheduled to participate in full batting practice Saturday. On the verge of full participation in pregame workouts, the club hopes to have Choo join them on their roadtrip to Minnesota next week. From there, he’ll be re-evaluated for a possible return against the Rays next weekend.

According to Indians manager Manny Acta, Choo might not even need a minor league rehab assignment before being activated from the disabled list.

“He’s kept himself in good shape physically,” Acta said of Choo. “We’re
not anticipating him going down [to the Minors]. Things could change.
But he hasn’t lost much time. He’s pretty close.”

Choo was batting .286/.390/.475 with 13 home runs, 45 RBI and 12 stolen bases before injuring his right thumb while attempting to make a diving catch on July 2. His rapid recovery would be a pleasant surprise for a sports town that hasn’t received much good news lately.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.