Phillies, Rangers, Yankees after Orioles' Ty Wigginton

1 Comment

Although he’s been in an awful slump since hitting 13 homers during April and May, Orioles utilityman Ty Wigginton is drawing interest from the Phillies, Rangers and Yankees, according to the Baltimore Sun’s Jeff Zrebiec.
Zrebiec says the Orioles and Phillies have discussed Wigginton for several weeks. The Philllies could install Wigginton at third base, with Placido Polanco moving to second base until Chase Utley returns from thumb surgery.
The Rangers and Yankees would seem to have less playing time for him, though the Rangers do need someone to start at first base against lefties and the Yankees still have their question mark at DH.
Zrebiec indicates that the Phillies could also be interested in Miguel Tejada if Wigginton is moved to one of the other teams.
Wigginton is making $3 million in the final season of a two-year deal. A huge early-season surprise, he’s hit just .205/.289/.265 with one homer in 132 at-bats since the beginning of June, leaving him at .252/.334/.434 overall. The Orioles had a high asking price for him a month ago, but they’ll probably come down on that now, particularly since there will be less of a role available for him if Brian Roberts returns in a couple of weeks as hoped.

Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for Red Sox

Bob Levey/Getty Images

No surprise here: Chris Sale will start on Opening Day for the Red Sox, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports. The Red Sox open the season on March 29 in Tampa Bay against the Rays. Sale will oppose Chris Archer.

Sale, 28, is the fifth different Opening Day starter the Red Sox have had in as many years, preceded by Rick Porcello, David Price, Clay Buchholz, and Jon Lester. Sale started on Opening Day for the White Sox in 2013, ’14, and ’16.

Sale finished second in AL Cy Young Award balloting last year and finished ninth for AL MVP. He went 17-8 with a 2.90 ERA and a 308/43 K/BB ratio in 214 1/3 innings. Sale and Clayton Kershaw (2015) are the only pitchers to strike out 300 or more batters in a season dating back to 2003.