The judge warns Frank and Jamie McCourt: shape up or I'll order the Dodgers sold

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Right after I got done reading that giant McCourts article posted below, I read Bill Shaikin’s article in the Los Angeles Times which reports the judge in the McCourts’ divorce case saying — contrary to what Frank McCourt has been insisting for months — that the Dodgers may have to go on the block:

“The parties are unintentionally pushing the court toward an interesting
position — selling the asset which is being fought over”

That comment comes after months of wrangling over legal fees and arguments between Frank and Jamie in which each of them tried to portray themselves — at varying times — as the richer or the poorer than the other, depending on which tack suited them at the time.

As the legal experts in the article note, the judge’s comment about the team having to go up for sale were most likely a warning to Frank and Jamie to stop their bickering. A nuclear option, if you will, that probably won’t be taken but could be if everyone doesn’t start behaving first. But even if it’s unlikely, it is most certainly something the judge could order if things get bad enough.

And after everything we’ve seen with the Rangers, the last thing anyone wants to go through at this point is another acrimonious franchise sale.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.