Yunel Escobar-Alex Gonzalez swap a definite win for Toronto

5 Comments

Yunel Escobar for Alex Gonzalez certainly isn’t a deal anyone saw coming a year or two ago. Sure, the Braves had always had something of a love-hate relationship with their Cuban shortstop, but they had no shortage of opportunities to move him for promising players. To trade him now for an older, less-rangy shortstop having a fluke year seems like a waste.
That’s not to say it can’t work out. While Escobar’s 2008 and 2009 seasons were arguably better than any Gonzalez has had since reaching the majors in 1998, he has been a complete bust this year with no sign of breaking out. It’s remarkable just how little power he’s displayed. Everything off his bat seems to be a popup or a grounder to short. His always fine strikeout rate has held steady and his walk rate is up, but he just hasn’t hit the ball with authority at any point this year.
Gonzalez, on the other hand, has a chance to put up a 30-homer season. He struggles to make contact and he’ll weaken the OBP at the bottom of Atlanta’s lineup, but he’ll probably manage to drive in some of the runners that Escobar was leaving on base. He’s also a steadier defender than Escobar, even if he has made 11 errors to Escobar’s nine this year. He’s lost a step, particularly on up-the-middle grounders, but he remains rock solid.
What I find particularly interesting about the deal is that the Braves, the contending team, knew they were giving up the superior property and insisted on getting a couple of prospects in return. Atlanta also parted with left-hander Jo-Jo Reyes in the five-player swap, but there’s no way the Blue Jays would have traded Tim Collins and infielder Tyler Pastornicky for him. Reyes’ stock has plummeted, and he was essentially a throw-in.
Collins, a 5-foot-7 southpaw, has struck out 73 in 43 innings for Double-A New Hampshire this year. He has a chance to be considerably more than a specialist, as righties have hit just .158 off him. Despite his small frame, he works in the low-90s consistently, and he has a quality curve. He’s a fine relief prospect.
Pastornicky, 20, was a fifth-round pick in 2008. He’s hit .258/.348/.376 with 24 steals while splitting time between shortstop and second base for Single-A Dunedin this season. He doesn’t currently project as a regular, but there’s still some room for growth — he’s already taken a step forward in the power department this year — and he’s a pretty good bet to turn into a nifty utilityman if he doesn’t reach his ceiling.
Of course, I still believe this was a no-brainer for the Blue Jays. Escobar is likely to revert to being a better player than Gonzalez next season, and he’s under control through 2013. He won’t even make very much next year because he has been so bad so far this year. My guess is that he’ll go to at least one All-Star Game as a Blue Jay.
That said, I also really liked the Scott Rolen-for-Edwin Encarnacion deal last year, and that similar trade of an established veteran for an underperforming younger player hasn’t worked out so well to date.
For the Braves, it’s a short-term fix. Gonzalez’s $2.5 million option for 2011 will almost surely be picked up, so the Braves will have him then, too. Still, this trade all boils down to how well Gonzalez plays over these next 2 1/2 or, hopefully, 3 1/2 months. If he solidifies a position the Braves were getting nothing from to date and the team goes far into the postseason, then the deal will be worth it regardless of how well Escobar bounces back.

Diamondbacks sign Jorge De La Rosa to minor league deal

ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 10:  Jorge De La Rosa #29 of the Colorado Rockies throws against the Texas Rangers in the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on August 10, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Diamondbacks have signed free agent left-hander Jorge De La Rosa to a minor league deal, per a team announcement on Sunday. The contract includes an invitation to spring training. Nick Piecoro of AZCentral.com adds that De La Rosa stands to make $2.25 million if he secures a spot on the major league roster, with up to $600,000 in incentives if he pitches out of the bullpen and up to $1 million in incentives if he pitches out of the starting rotation.

The 35-year-old is expected to compete for a bullpen role after spending the better part of a decade in the Rockies’ rotation. He capped a nine-year run with Colorado in 2016, finishing the year with a 5.51 ERA, 4.2 BB/9 and 7.3 SO/9 over 134 innings. Despite his struggles out of the rotation, he found limited success in a three-game stint in the bullpen, striking out 10 of 26 batters and holding the opposition to just three hits and one earned run in eight innings.

The veteran lefty is set to join a bullpen comprised of right-handers Randall Delgado, Jake Barrett and Fernando Rodney, along with a number of unproven candidates on similar minor league contracts. His age and command issues may be off-putting, but the promise he showed as a reliever should give the Diamondbacks some upside as they attempt to redeem a league-worst bullpen in 2017.

Josh Donaldson out 2-3 weeks with calf injury

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 13: Josh Donaldson #20 of the Toronto Blue Jays looks on from the top step of the dugout as he sits out his second straight game during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 13, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Blue Jays’ third baseman Josh Donaldson is expected to miss up to three weeks with a right calf strain, reports John Lott. Donaldson reportedly felt some discomfort in his calf during sprinting drills on Friday and was diagnosed with what looked like a mild strain after undergoing an MRI on Saturday. According to Lott, the 31-year-old is on crutches for the next few days and will likely miss 2-3 weeks of spring training.

Donaldson had a similar scare at the start of the 2016 season, when he limped out of the batter’s box during the Blue Jays’ first regular season road trip with a right calf strain. He returned to DH two days later, however, and was back on the field in less than a week’s time. Blue Jays’ GM Ross Atkins told MLB.com’s Corey Long that the two calf injuries are unrelated, and expects that Donaldson will recover in similar fashion this spring — well before Opening Day comes around.