Selig still set to retire after 2012 unless there's "an emergency"

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Bud Selig just got done with his annual All-Star Game news conference. I don’t have a transcript yet, but enough reporters there on the scene are tweeting about it to give us a few gems:

  • Selig said that it is still his plan is to retire after the 2012
    season.  Which he has to reiterate, because he has already blown through a multiple putative retirement dates in the past, only to stay on longer.  He says this one is legit, however, unless there is “an emergency.”  Query: if baseball finds itself in an emergency in 2012, won’t it be because Bud steered the ship in that direction? If things are terrible then, it’s an even bigger reason for Bud to go.

  • Selig wants to tighten up the schedule. He said “I live in fear of November.” I’m assuming he means the weather. I know it will cost some money, but schedule a handful of doubleheaders during the season and cut out postseason days off and we’re in October every year.

  • Selig predicts that baseball’s revenue will be up around $7 billion for 2010, up from $6.5 billion in 2009.  Silly bald bloggers can make all the cracks we, er, I mean they want to at Selig’s expense, but the man has delivered in the one job he is truly tasked with doing: making money for the owners and keeping the game on a sound financial footing.
  • He dodged a question about the 2011 All-Star Game in Arizona. I’m not sure this is really an issue for anyone anymore. Suit has been filed over the immigration law, and an injunction will likely follow. It was a different story before then because people were concerned about the law being active, but now Selig should just say as much, defer to the legal and political process and be done with it.

Overall not much to report from the Commissioner, I guess. Which in the business of baseball is a pretty good thing.

Danny Farquhar taken to hospital after fainting in dugout

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White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar passed out in the dugout after completing his outing against the Astros on Friday evening. The cause of the incident has yet to be determined, but Farquhar was supervised by the club’s medical personnel and EMTs and regained consciousness before being taken to Rush University Medical Center for further treatment and testing. A diagnosis has not been announced by the team.

Farquhar pitched 2/3 of an inning in relief during Friday’s 10-0 loss to Houston. He was brought in to relieve James Shields in the top of the sixth inning and was immediately bested by George Springer, who belted a ground-rule double down the right field line and scored Brian McCann and Derek Fisher for the Astros’ sixth and seventh runs of the night. He recovered to strike out Jose Altuve, but was again punished with a two-run homer from Carlos Correa (his first of two), and induced a fly out to end the inning.

The 31-year-old righty pitched just 7 1/3 innings with the club prior to Friday’s performance, issuing four hits, three runs, two homers and eight strikeouts in seven appearances.