Selig still set to retire after 2012 unless there's "an emergency"

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Bud Selig just got done with his annual All-Star Game news conference. I don’t have a transcript yet, but enough reporters there on the scene are tweeting about it to give us a few gems:

  • Selig said that it is still his plan is to retire after the 2012
    season.  Which he has to reiterate, because he has already blown through a multiple putative retirement dates in the past, only to stay on longer.  He says this one is legit, however, unless there is “an emergency.”  Query: if baseball finds itself in an emergency in 2012, won’t it be because Bud steered the ship in that direction? If things are terrible then, it’s an even bigger reason for Bud to go.

  • Selig wants to tighten up the schedule. He said “I live in fear of November.” I’m assuming he means the weather. I know it will cost some money, but schedule a handful of doubleheaders during the season and cut out postseason days off and we’re in October every year.

  • Selig predicts that baseball’s revenue will be up around $7 billion for 2010, up from $6.5 billion in 2009.  Silly bald bloggers can make all the cracks we, er, I mean they want to at Selig’s expense, but the man has delivered in the one job he is truly tasked with doing: making money for the owners and keeping the game on a sound financial footing.
  • He dodged a question about the 2011 All-Star Game in Arizona. I’m not sure this is really an issue for anyone anymore. Suit has been filed over the immigration law, and an injunction will likely follow. It was a different story before then because people were concerned about the law being active, but now Selig should just say as much, defer to the legal and political process and be done with it.

Overall not much to report from the Commissioner, I guess. Which in the business of baseball is a pretty good thing.

Report: Momentum in talks between Mariners, Jon Jay

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MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports that there is some momentum in talks between the Mariners and free agent outfielder Jon Jay.

Jay, 32, hit .296/.374/.375 in 433 plate appearances with the Cubs last season, which is adequate. He’s heralded more for his defense and his ability to play all three outfield spots.

The Mariners are losing center fielder Jarrod Dyson to free agency and likely don’t want to rely on Guillermo Heredia next season, hence the interest in Jay. The free agent class for center fielders is otherwise relatively weak.