Bobby Valentine's reaction at not getting the Florida Marlins' job

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There’s a long, interesting story over at SportsBusiness Journal today, breaking down the different philosophies between ESPN’s “Baseball Tonight” and MLB Newtwork’s “MLB Tonight” shows.  It starts out with a behind the scenes look at how Bobby Valentine reacted after he found out that he wouldn’t be the Marlins’ next manager.

The scene: Valentine, Kruk and the others are watching games on video screens in the BBTN conference room.  Jeff Loria comes on the broadcast of the Mets-Marlins game from Puerto Rico and says that Edwin Rodriguez has the job.  Valentine already knew he wasn’t getting the job, but apparently had not heard from Jeff Loria about it yet and didn’t know that Rodriguez was keeping the job. Valentine flipped just a little bit:

“I can’t believe this,” he exclaimed to a room of around a dozen
employees and on-air talent preparing for the nightly “Baseball
Tonight” broadcast. “That’s not where he [Loria] told me he was.”

“Are you saying that he lied?” asked John Kruk, a .300 hitter over a
decade as major leaguer and now one of the ESPN show’s most popular
baseball analysts.

“I’m just saying that he told me he was in a different place than
where I just saw him,” Valentine said.

He grabbed his cell phone and left the room. He returned a few
minutes later, still fixated on the Mets-Marlins game on the screen.

Based on the account I’m surprised that Valentine — though he got his digs in — was as civil as he was about it all by the time he actually went on the air and talked about it.

And about that: the SBJ story spends a lot of time talking about the differences between “Baseball Tonight” and “MLB Tonight.” And there’s a reason the Valentine anecdote serves as the lead in.  Check this out:

[The Bobby Valentine] interview is exactly what [ESPN’s Norby] Williamson wants from “Baseball
Tonight.” He’s looking for talent that will be in the news and will
have to talk about it on ESPN.

Look, I’m not going to dispute the fact that ESPN has been wildly successful over the years, but do we as fans really benefit by ESPN personnel to “be in the news?” That’s the same kind of thinking that led to the LeBron James fiasco and which chips away at the network’s credibility as a news source daily.  Most notably when the news is bad for ESPN people and athletes who are closely associated with the network like Ben Roethlisberger. In those cases we can never be sure if what we’re getting from ESPN is the whole story.

MLB Network has its own issues in this regard, I suppose. For example, I think there’s an open question as to how critical of Major League Baseball’s decisions is the network really free to be.  But it’s not like the network has a desire to insert itself into the story like that either.

At the end of the day I think I’d just prefer someone knowledgeable to tell me what happened on the field that night and leave the intrigue to reality shows and stuff.

Reid Brignac is trying to become a switch hitter

LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL - FEBRUARY 26:  Reid Brignac #4 of the Atlanta Braves poses on photo day at Champion Stadium on February 26, 2016 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Rob Carr/Getty Images
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Veteran utilityman Reid Brignac is in camp with the Astros on a minor league deal. The 31-year-old is close to being done as a major leaguer as he owns a career .219/.264/.309 triple-slash line across parts of nine seasons. In an effort to prolong his big league career, Brignac is now attempting to become a switch-hitter, MLB.com’s Brian McTaggart reports.

I’m going to try it out this year. It was something that I just thought long and hard about and I was like, ‘OK, I’m going to try and see how it goes.’ I used to switch-hit when I was younger off and on, nothing consistent. I could always handle the bat right-handed. I play golf right-handed, so I do a lot of things that way that feel natural.

I just want to get to the point where I’m trying to stay in games, not get pinch-hit for, not starting games because a lefty is starting. … That could help me stay in the games longer. I’m trying to add a new element. I play multiple positions and now if I can switch hit and be consistent at it, then that can only help me.

As Brignac mentions, he’s also verstile. He’s a shortstop by trade, but has also logged plenty of innings at second base and third base, and has occasionally played corner outfield.

There aren’t any examples — at least that I can think of — where players began switch-hitting late in their careers and actually succeeding in the major leagues. As the saying goes, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. But here’s hoping Brignac bucks the trend.

Video: Andrelton Simmons makes a heads-up play to catch Carlos Asuaje off first base

ANAHEIM, CA - AUGUST 03:  Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim returns to the dugout after scoring in the second inning against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on August 3, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)
Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images
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Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons fell off the map a bit last year due to a combination of the Angels’ mediocrity, Simmons’ lack of offense, and a month-plus of missed action due to a torn ligament in his left thumb.

Simmons is still as good and as smart as ever on defense. That was on full display Monday when the Angels hosted the Padres for an afternoon spring exhibition.

With a runner on first base and nobody out in the top of the second inning, Carlos Asuaje grounded a 2-0 J.C. Ramirez fastball to right field. The runner, Hunter Renfroe, advanced to third base. Meanwhile, Asuaje wandered a little too far off the first base bag. Simmons cut off the throw to first base, spun around and fired to Luis Valbuena at first base. Valbuena swiped the tag on Asuaje for the first out of the inning.