Chuck Greenberg and Nolan Ryan sue the Texas Rangers. This is not a typo.

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I have yet to see the lawsuit, but SportsBusiness Journal’s Daniel Kaplan is reporting that Chuck Greenberg and Nolan Ryan are suing the Texas Rangers.

Yes, you read that correctly.

The reason according to Kaplan: the court-appointed restructuring officer (“CRO”) — who acts on behalf of the bankrupt entity (i.e. the Rangers) — is attempting “to hijack the proceedings,” via its soliciting other bids in violation of Greenberg and Ryan’s exclusivity rights which last until August 12th. Why they didn’t raise this two weeks ago when the idea of an auction — and thus the virtual certainty of other bidders — first came into play is an open question. For what it’s worth, however, Kaplan’s reporting suggests that the CRO isn’t just soliciting bids, but rather, is negotiating with other potential buyers.  That could be Jim Crane or it could be Jeff Beck. Either way, it’s pissing Greenberg and Ryan off.

Look, there are a lot of complicated legal reasons which could explain why such a tack is being taken. None of which necessarily mean that Greenberg and Ryan’s ultimate ownership of the team is in jeopardy. But really, how can this be a good thing? Indeed, the fact from Kaplan’s report I find most telling is that Greenberg has new lawyers (White & Case).  Whenever a new team comes in so late in the game it almost always means acrimony and ugliness behind the scenes or, at the very least, of plans gone astray. When such a thing happens, it’s not uncommon for the new guys to counsel an offensive, which is what we’re apparently seeing here.

The Rangers got their big trade done, so maybe this is whole drama is now academic from a “compete in 2010” perspective. Indeed, maybe the Cliff Lee trade made Greenberg and Ryan feel free to just unleash in a way they wouldn’t have had they still been sweating the deadline. Hard to say.  Either way, this sale keeps getting messier and messier.

Yankees’ offense wakes up, leads way to 8-1 win vs. Astros in ALCS Game 3

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The Yankees’ offense finally woke up, scoring eight runs in Game 3 of the ALCS on Monday night while the pitching kept the Astros’ offense at bay. That came after scoring a total of two runs against Astros pitching in the first two games. For a recap of the Yankees’ scoring in Game 3, click here.

CC Sabathia wasn’t dominant, but he executed pitches when he needed to most, preventing the Astros from capitalizing on their opportunities. Overall, he gave up three hits and four walks while striking out five on 99 pitches. He’s the first pitcher, age 37 or older, to throw six shutout innings in the postseason since Pedro Martinez for the Phillies against the Dodgers in Game 2 of the 2009 NLCS. Monday’s start also marked Sabathia’s first career scoreless outing in the postseason — it was his 22nd postseason appearance.

Astros starter Charlie Morton couldn’t escape the fourth inning, when he allowed a run and loaded the bases before departing. Will Harris allowed all three inherited runners to score on Aaron Judge‘s three-run home run to left field. Morton was ultimately charged with seven runs on six hits, two walks, and a hit batsman with three strikeouts in 3 2/3 innings.

The Yankees’ bullpen held the fort after the sixth. Adam Warren worked a scoreless seventh. Warren returned in the eighth and retired the side in order, despite yielding a pair of well-struck balls to deep center field.

In the ninth, Dellin Betances walked both hitters he faced to start the frame. Unsurprisingly, manager Joe Girardi had a short leash and brought in Tommy Kahnle. Kahnle gave up a single to Cameron Maybin then struck out George Springer, but walked Alex Bregman to force in a run. Kahnle got Jose Altuve to ground into a 4-3 double play to end the game in an 8-1 victory, giving the Yankees their first win of the series.

The ALCS continues on Tuesday at 5 PM ET. The Astros will start Lance McCullers and the Yankees will send Sonny Gray to the hill.