LeBron got you down? Heyward and Strasburg are not your saviors

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Buster Olney had this to say in his column this morning:

The LeBron James Look-At-Me Tour underscored why watching young players like Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg has been so much fun this year: As great as their promise is, they do not carry themselves as if they’re bigger and more important than those around them, and the bet here is that this isn’t going to change.

Strasburg pitches again tonight, and I’m guessing you won’t see him clap a cloud of resin over his head, his arms outstretched toward the heavens, before he throws his first pitch.

I don’t believe people still say stuff like this.  You saw what Jason Heyward said about James last night.  He thought that spectacle was pretty neat.  But even if that was just a random tweet we shouldn’t take seriously (which it probably was), if we’ve learned anything over the past couple of decades of sports scandal and drama, it’s that projecting purity and goodness on young athletes is foolhardy, even if it is understandable.

As is the case with so many things, Bill James said it best, this time in in The New Bill
James Historical Baseball Abstract
nearly ten years ago:

When a young player comes to the major leagues and has success right
away, writers will almost always write about what a fine young man he is
as well as a supreme talent. Never pay any attention to those articles
or those descriptions. Albert Pujols is going through this now . . .
people who didn’t know Albert Pujols from Jack the Ripper six months ago
and have never talked to him more than six feet from his locker are
writing very sincerely about what an exceptional young man he is . . .
Sportswriters, despite their cynicism or because of it, desperately want
to believe in athletes as heroes, and will project their hopes onto
anyone who offers a blank slate. The problem with this is that, when the
player turns out to be human and fallible, people feel betrayed. It is a
disservice to athletes to try to make them more than they really are.

Albert Pujols may prove the exception to the rule, actually, but the point remains a good one: don’t assume anything other than humanity — both good and bad — on the part of young athletes, and don’t expect anything other than the excellent athletic performances they provide.  To do so asks too much and leads, inevitably, to disappointment.

Remember: people said all kinds of things about LeBron James until very, very recently. Who knows what they’ll say about Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg seven years from now?

Josh Johnson retires from baseball

PEORIA, AZ - FEBRUARY 21: Josh Johnson #55 of the San Diego Padres poses during Picture Day on February 21, 2014 at the Peoria Sports Complex in Peoria, Arizona. (Photo by Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)
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Oft-injured pitcher Josh Johnson is retiring from baseball, ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick is reporting.

Johnson, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2013. The right-hander underwent his third Tommy John surgery in September 2015 but wasn’t able to bounce back.

Johnson spent most of his career with the Marlins, but also pitched for the Blue Jays in the big leagues, as well as the Padres in the minors. He retires with a career 3.40 ERA, 915 strikeouts across 998 innings in the majors, and two All-Star nominations. Johnson led the National League with a 2.30 ERA in 2010, finishing fifth in NL Cy Young Award balloting. One wonders what he could have accomplished if he was able to stay healthy.

Report: Angels close to a multi-year deal with Luis Valbuena

HOUSTON, TX - JULY 08:  Luis Valbuena #18 of the Houston Astros hits a three run walkoff home run in the ninth inning to defeat the Oakland Athletics 10-9 at Minute Maid Park on July 8, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
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The Angels are nearing a multi-year deal with free agent third baseman Luis Valbuena, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. It’s believed to be a two-year contract with a third-year option.

Valbuena, 31, hit .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances in 2016. He missed most of the second half with a hamstring injury, for which he underwent surgery in late August.

Valbuena has played a majority of his career at third base, but also has extensive experience at second base and has racked up innings at first base and shortstop as well. He won’t play every day for the Angels, as Yunel Escobar lays claim to third base and C.J. Cron first base, but he will give them flexibility and a left-handed bat off the bench.