LeBron got you down? Heyward and Strasburg are not your saviors


Buster Olney had this to say in his column this morning:

The LeBron James Look-At-Me Tour underscored why watching young players like Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg has been so much fun this year: As great as their promise is, they do not carry themselves as if they’re bigger and more important than those around them, and the bet here is that this isn’t going to change.

Strasburg pitches again tonight, and I’m guessing you won’t see him clap a cloud of resin over his head, his arms outstretched toward the heavens, before he throws his first pitch.

I don’t believe people still say stuff like this.  You saw what Jason Heyward said about James last night.  He thought that spectacle was pretty neat.  But even if that was just a random tweet we shouldn’t take seriously (which it probably was), if we’ve learned anything over the past couple of decades of sports scandal and drama, it’s that projecting purity and goodness on young athletes is foolhardy, even if it is understandable.

As is the case with so many things, Bill James said it best, this time in in The New Bill
James Historical Baseball Abstract
nearly ten years ago:

When a young player comes to the major leagues and has success right
away, writers will almost always write about what a fine young man he is
as well as a supreme talent. Never pay any attention to those articles
or those descriptions. Albert Pujols is going through this now . . .
people who didn’t know Albert Pujols from Jack the Ripper six months ago
and have never talked to him more than six feet from his locker are
writing very sincerely about what an exceptional young man he is . . .
Sportswriters, despite their cynicism or because of it, desperately want
to believe in athletes as heroes, and will project their hopes onto
anyone who offers a blank slate. The problem with this is that, when the
player turns out to be human and fallible, people feel betrayed. It is a
disservice to athletes to try to make them more than they really are.

Albert Pujols may prove the exception to the rule, actually, but the point remains a good one: don’t assume anything other than humanity — both good and bad — on the part of young athletes, and don’t expect anything other than the excellent athletic performances they provide.  To do so asks too much and leads, inevitably, to disappointment.

Remember: people said all kinds of things about LeBron James until very, very recently. Who knows what they’ll say about Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg seven years from now?

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.

Carlos Santana in left field? Sure, OK.

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 15:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a home run in the second inning against J.A. Happ #33 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game two of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 15, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that Indians First Baseman/DH Carlos Santana shagged some flyballs in left field during the Indians’ workout today.

Sure, why not? Santana has played one game in the outfield in his major league career and that was over four years ago, but the Indians will have to play in Chicago without the DH, meaning either losing Santana’s bat or that of Mike Napoli.

It would be up to Terry Francona to decide if that happens, but ultimately I don’t think he’ll make it real and, rather, will just forget about it, because Santana’s defense out there would in no way be smooth.

I’m sorry. I’m sick today and I’m on a lot of cold medicine.