LeBron got you down? Heyward and Strasburg are not your saviors

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Buster Olney had this to say in his column this morning:

The LeBron James Look-At-Me Tour underscored why watching young players like Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg has been so much fun this year: As great as their promise is, they do not carry themselves as if they’re bigger and more important than those around them, and the bet here is that this isn’t going to change.

Strasburg pitches again tonight, and I’m guessing you won’t see him clap a cloud of resin over his head, his arms outstretched toward the heavens, before he throws his first pitch.

I don’t believe people still say stuff like this.  You saw what Jason Heyward said about James last night.  He thought that spectacle was pretty neat.  But even if that was just a random tweet we shouldn’t take seriously (which it probably was), if we’ve learned anything over the past couple of decades of sports scandal and drama, it’s that projecting purity and goodness on young athletes is foolhardy, even if it is understandable.

As is the case with so many things, Bill James said it best, this time in in The New Bill
James Historical Baseball Abstract
nearly ten years ago:

When a young player comes to the major leagues and has success right
away, writers will almost always write about what a fine young man he is
as well as a supreme talent. Never pay any attention to those articles
or those descriptions. Albert Pujols is going through this now . . .
people who didn’t know Albert Pujols from Jack the Ripper six months ago
and have never talked to him more than six feet from his locker are
writing very sincerely about what an exceptional young man he is . . .
Sportswriters, despite their cynicism or because of it, desperately want
to believe in athletes as heroes, and will project their hopes onto
anyone who offers a blank slate. The problem with this is that, when the
player turns out to be human and fallible, people feel betrayed. It is a
disservice to athletes to try to make them more than they really are.

Albert Pujols may prove the exception to the rule, actually, but the point remains a good one: don’t assume anything other than humanity — both good and bad — on the part of young athletes, and don’t expect anything other than the excellent athletic performances they provide.  To do so asks too much and leads, inevitably, to disappointment.

Remember: people said all kinds of things about LeBron James until very, very recently. Who knows what they’ll say about Jason Heyward and Stephen Strasburg seven years from now?

Jonny Venters is still pitching

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Lefty reliever Jonny Venters was among a handful of players the Rays signed to minor league contracts, Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Venters, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2012 and has logged just 27 2/3 innings in the minors in the meantime due to a continuous battle with his elbow. According to David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Venters has undergone four — four! — Tommy John surgeries.

When he was healthy, Venters was a fearsome late-game option for the Braves. He posted a 1.95 ERA with 93 strikeouts in 83 innings in 2010, and a 1.84 ERA with 96 strikeouts in 88 innings in 2011. His first-half performance in 2011 earned him a spot on the National League All-Star roster.

Venters has spent the last two years in the Rays’ system and he’ll try to make it a third.