Meet the people who work at the ballpark

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Not the players and the umps, but the behind the scenes folks like vendors and security guards and stuff.  Daniel Paulling of the Kansas City Star has interesting profiles of a bunch of them who work at Kauffman Stadium.  This bit — about a security guard who works down by the players’ wives section — caught my eye:

Burnett has developed a system where he can spot people who have
moved down to better seats.

While he doesn’t want to share too
many secrets, he said the way a person acts and other little things are
big giveaways.

It’s not terribly hard to spot people trying to trade up.  The key is what you do about it.  Some guys — like this guy — kick ’em back to where their real seats are.  Other guys just turn a blind eye, realizing that as long as the real ticket holder isn’t there it probably doesn’t matter.

But some guys — like the ushers at a ballpark I’ve been to a few times but which I won’t identify because I don’t want to get anyone in trouble — will steer you directly to a primo, unoccupied seat as early as the first inning for as little as a finsky.  They’ll even wipe it down for you as if you bought the seat yourself.

But, hey, if the guy in Kansas City wants to leave a few Lincolns on the table, that’s no skin off my nose . . .

The Tigers decline Anibal Sanchez’s 2018 option

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From the “this does not surprise us in the very least” department, Tigers GM Al Avila announced today that the club is declining its $16 million option on right-hander Anibal Sanchez.

Sanchez had a terrible year in 2017, going 3-7 with a 6.41 ERA in 2017. That’s a long slide down from his 2013 season, in which he won the AL ERA title, going 14-8 and posting an ERA of 2.57 in the first year of his five-year, $80 million deal. Since then he’s gone 28-35 with a 5.15 ERA. He never started 30 games or more over the course of the contract.

The declination of the option does come with a nice parting gift for Sanchez: a $5 million buyout. Which is pretty dang high for a buyout, but that’s how the Tigers rolled three or four years ago.