Bankruptcy trustee tells the Rangers to get new lawyers

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Many people thought it problematic when it was revealed several months ago that Tom Hicks was both (a) selling the Rangers; and (b) part of the ownership buying the Rangers.  Different capacities, sure, in that Tom Hicks the individual was buying from an entity — Hicks Sports Group — that Hicks just so happened to own and run, but it is the kind of thing that raises eyebrows among those who are not used to the often convoluted and incestuous world of closely-held corporations.

But public perception may not be the only problem. The trustee overseeing the Rangers’ bankruptcy has a problem with at least one aspect of the overall arrangement, and that involves the law firms.  Take it away Barry Shlachter:

U.S.
Trustee William Neary asserted that all of the work – and millions
in fees – Weil Gotshal & Manges received from team owner Tom Hicks
jeopardized the fairness and transparency expected by the
public, including Rangers fans. Attorneys for the baseball
franchise are charged with acting in its best interests, not that
of the outgoing ownership.

“Undoubtedly, Weil
Gotshal & Manges’ role evolved and shifted as events
transpired before the bankruptcy case, but it was WGM’s responsibility
to focus on the conflicts issue,” Neary said in the filing with a
U.S. bankruptcy court in Fort Worth.

Weil Gotshal denies any suggestion that it was conflicted, of course.

My view: I’m just a dumb litigator who nobody ever let near the table when a complicated deal was being negotiated, but it’s not like having the same law firm all over a transaction like this has never happened before. There are a lot of ways to guard against conflicts when you have hundreds and hundreds of lawyers you can throw at a deal, many of whom don’t even know one another.  Best practice in the world? Nah, but it’s not, in and of itself, fatal.

In light of that my guess is that there was something specifically troublesome that either Hicks or the law firm was doing during the course of this deal that raised the ire of the trustee. These things tend to get ironed out pretty quickly, however, and my guess is that the law firm problem doesn’t cause any big hiccup in a deal that has enough other hiccups.

Yankees activate Didi Gregorius from the disabled list

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The Yankees have activated shortstop Didi Gregorius from the 10-day disabled list, the club announced on Friday. Infielder Pete Kozma was designated for assignment to clear roster space.

Gregorius, 27, suffered a strained right shoulder while playing in the World Baseball Classic last month. He’s in Friday’s starting lineup, batting sixth against the Orioles.

Last season, Gregorius hit .276/.304/.447 with 20 home runs and 70 RBI in 597 plate appearances.

Mets to place Yoenis Cespedes on the 10-day disabled list

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the Mets will place outfielder Yoenis Cespedes on the 10-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring. Cespedes left Thursday’s game after suffering the injury running the bases.

Things keep going poorly for the Mets, who are in last place in the NL East with an 8-13 record. Cespedes will join a lengthy list of names in the infirmary, including David Wright, Lucas Duda, Wilmer Flores, Steven Matz, Seth Lugo, and Noah Syndergaard.

Cespedes is batting a very productive .270/.373/.619 with six home runs and 10 RBI through his first 75 plate appearances.

With Cespedes out, Michael Conforto should be cemented as an everyday player and Juan Lagares will handle center field with Granderson moving back to right field and Jay Bruce covering first base.