Teams are calling the Braves about Yunel Escobar

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Because teams in tight pennant races trade their starting shortstops so often.  ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick in the form of a FrankenTweet:

Heard today that the Braves are getting calls from
some teams looking to “bottom feed” on underachieving SS Yunel
Escobar . . .
Braves are hesitant to move Escobar because he’s
only 27, is super-talented and they think he might be in for a big
second half . . .
Atlanta also doesn’t have an alternative at SS.
(Omar Infante is not an everyday guy). It’s hard trading a SS in
mid-pennant race.

Omar Infante is not an every day guy?!  Used to be people respected All-Stars. The nerve.

Anyway, Crasnick is right about all of that. The Braves tear their hair out at Escobar, but with a fragile Chipper Jones needing Infante to caddy for him and no Rafael Belliard-style uber glove man waiting in the wings to plug in at shortstop, there’s no way they’d lose Escobar. They may cut bait on him in the offseason — again, they really don’t like the guy all that much — but they need him right now.

In other news, now would probably be a good time to torture all of my fellow Braves fans by reminding them once again that if John Schuerholz had simply held his water, not traded for Mark Teixeira and allowed the 2007 Braves to finish the season in third place like they would have anyway, Elvis Andrus would be playing shortstop right now, Neftali Feliz would probably be filling Kenshin Kawakami’s place in the rotation and Jarrod Saltalamaccia and Matt Harrison could have been traded for an outfielder or something.

But of course I’m not one to dwell on the past.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.