Edgar Renteria is Shaggy, Pablo Sandoval is Scooby

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There was some farkakte story back in May about how the Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee was haunted and that because of it visiting baseball players don’t like to stay there.  It was on a local news station and it came during May sweeps, so take it with the same grain of salt you take those “What 176 things in your house could kill your children! Story at 11!” promos that pop up around those times.

Word is now circulating, however, that the Pfister has spooked two more ballplayers — Pablo Sandoval and Edgar Renteria — who have checked out of the Pfister and have checked into another hotel down the street. Worth noting, however, that I couldn’t find any report of this other than the no-quote, no-link one linked above. And it’s an NBC site for cryin’ out loud, so it’s probably unmitigated horse hockey. You know how those guys are.

But assuming the report is true, I’m very disappointed to hear this news.  Pablo Sandoval is young and impressionable so I’ll grant him his heebie jeebies. But Renteria is a wise and experienced man who was a boy in the late 70s and early 80s. He should know full well, therefore, that the “ghost” at the Pfister is really just the old caretaker in a mask, trying to scare away meddling kids.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.