Edgar Renteria is Shaggy, Pablo Sandoval is Scooby

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There was some farkakte story back in May about how the Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee was haunted and that because of it visiting baseball players don’t like to stay there.  It was on a local news station and it came during May sweeps, so take it with the same grain of salt you take those “What 176 things in your house could kill your children! Story at 11!” promos that pop up around those times.

Word is now circulating, however, that the Pfister has spooked two more ballplayers — Pablo Sandoval and Edgar Renteria — who have checked out of the Pfister and have checked into another hotel down the street. Worth noting, however, that I couldn’t find any report of this other than the no-quote, no-link one linked above. And it’s an NBC site for cryin’ out loud, so it’s probably unmitigated horse hockey. You know how those guys are.

But assuming the report is true, I’m very disappointed to hear this news.  Pablo Sandoval is young and impressionable so I’ll grant him his heebie jeebies. But Renteria is a wise and experienced man who was a boy in the late 70s and early 80s. He should know full well, therefore, that the “ghost” at the Pfister is really just the old caretaker in a mask, trying to scare away meddling kids.

Danny Farquhar is “progressing well” after surgery

Danny Farquhar
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The White Sox announced yesterday that pitcher Danny Farquhar, who suffered a brain aneurysm on Friday night, is “progressing well” after undergoing brain surgery.

The White Sox say that Farquhar has use of his extremities, is able to respond to questions and commands and can speak to doctors and to his family. He remains in critical but “neurologically stable” condition, according to the statement.

As reported earlier, he’ll likely remain in the hospital for three weeks. There has been no discussion about his future in baseball, but Bob Nightengale reported yesterday that, according to neurologists with whom he spoke, the recovery from the sort of aneurysm which felled Farquhar is measured in “months, not weeks,” and it’s possible that he never pitches again.