Dallas Braden doesn't like the "Get off my mound" shirts. Pardon me, your majesty

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We passed along word last week that the A’s were selling “Get off my mound” t-shirts in honor of the Yankees’ return to Oakland.  Sounded like a great idea to me in a fun, self-effacing kind of way. But apparently they don’t do self-deprecation in the 209, because Dallas Braden hates the shirts:

“They’re trying to generate revenue, trying to get butts in the seats, I
can see that. It’s almost like, at what cost do you do
that? They didn’t have permission. They were told on multiple occasions
that, no, it’s not a good idea. It’s not going to be approved. They just
kind of put the horse-blinders on and ran with it . . . . . It’s just not cool. It’s just a serious, gross lack of tact. At the end
of the day, I hope I do not become associated with that kind of
approach.”

Hey Dallas: if you didn’t want to be “associated with that kind of approach,” perhaps you shouldn’t have barked like some kind of loon about the sanctity of Greater Bradenia. As it is, you made a fool out of yourself and everyone is having fun with it now. Even A-Rod who, according to the Daily News article linked above, got a big laugh out of the fact that Robby Cano wore one of the shirts in the clubhouse before the game in order to taunt him.

Upon closer reading it’s hard to tell if Braden’s displeasure is about the shirt itself or if he’s really upset that it’s not MLBPA approved and thus (a) does not have his name and likeness on it; and (b) he does not get a cut of the sales.  Probably a little of both.  Which means that he’s got no sense of humor and that he’s trying to cover his business savvy with a mock (or at least mockable) sense of decorum.

Of course if Braden really wanted to get in on the shirt money, I’m assuming he could have told the MLBPA that he was all for it, they would have approved it and he’d have some extra dough.  So this probably is more a matter of Braden being embarrassed about the whole “get off my mound” incident than it is a business thing.

In which case I’d advise him that one looks pretty silly trying to distance oneself from one’s own words in the space of a couple of months. Better to just own it dude.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.