39th pick Anthony Ranaudo wants top-10 cash from Red Sox

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LSU junior Anthony Ranaudo entered this year as Baseball America‘s top-ranked college prospect, but the 6-foot-7 right-hander fell to the Red Sox with the 39th overall pick because of an elbow injury and major struggles once he returned.
Boston’s financial advantage allows them to take draft-day gambles on high-upside prospects like Ranaudo when other teams shy away based on the risk or above-slot bonus demands, and sure enough he’s asking for first-round money to sign.
In fact, LSU coach David Grewe told Amanda Comak of the Cape Cod Times that Ranaudo won’t sign unless he’s “treated and viewed as one of the top 10 picks in the draft … in terms of their financial commitment.” Grewe added that Ranaudo “wants to come back to LSU and prove that he can be that guy.”
It’s an interesting decision for Ranaudo, because the Red Sox would no doubt be willing to give him at least $1 million (and perhaps quite a bit more) to sign. For a 20-year-old pitcher coming off an injury wrecked season that sounds pretty good, but the flip side is that returning to LSU with a healthy, dominant performance next season would almost surely make him a top-five pick in line for a bonus closer to $5 million.
Do you take $1 million now and get a head start on your pro career while setting things up for a life after baseball if the elbow problems prove serious? Or do you pass up $1 million for a chance to make several times that at the risk of ending up with a blown out arm? It’s probably a moot point, because Ranaudo is represented by Scott Boras and he surely won’t be advising him to take the guaranteed cash now unless the Red Sox cave in with lots of “extra” money.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.