Your HBT guide to this year's biggest All-Star Game snubs

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As with any All-Star event that has a limited number of roster spots, there were some rather unfair omissions from this year’s Midsummer Classic. 

But that’s just how it goes.  35 players are selected from the American League and 35 make it from the National League.  There’s no way to sneak a deserving player into the park, and each MLB team must have at least one representative. 

A multi-week fan vote is used to decide the starting position players on each side and the rest of the names are selected through a combination of player ballots and personal picks made by All-Star managers Charlie Manuel and Joe Girardi.

It’s not a perfect system, but a perfect system probably doesn’t exist for matters such as these.  Thus, we are left with the following 2010 All-Star Game snubs:

Guys like Joey Votto, Paul Konerko and Kevin Youkilis, who still have a shot via MLB’s Final Vote, were not included.  Full rosters can be found here.

Dan Uggla, 2B, Marlins

One of the more under-appreciated players in the National League, Uggla has hit 15 home runs and collected 46 RBI in 80 games this season.  He doesn’t have the best reputation on defense, but he has a positive 1.7 UZR/150 as of July 3 and surely deserved the nod over Omar Infante, who is a utility infielder at heart, and Brandon Phillips, who has totaled just 10 homers and 27 RBI in 82 games for Cincinnati.

Francisco Liriano, SP, Twins

What does this man have to do?  Liriano has roared back onto the national baseball scene this year with a 3.32 ERA, a 1.22 WHIP and 116 strikeouts over 105.2 innings.  He has dominated some of the American League’s most relentless lineups over the first half and he has held left-handed hitters to a .179/.188/.226 batting line.  The 26-year-old southpaw would be awfully useful if the NL decided to go lefty-heavy in the later innings.

Colby Rasmus, CF, Cardinals

Rasmus doesn’t have the bankroll of teammate and NL All-Star reserve Matt Holliday, but he has been miles better at the plate this season.  Through 243 at-bats, the 23-year-old is hitting .280 with 16 home runs and 40 RBI.  His .923 OPS ranks fourth-best among all MLB outfielders.  Holliday, meanwhile, has 11 home runs, 39 RBI and an .872 OPS in 300 at-bats.

Jered Weaver, SP, Angels

The 27-year-old is leading all major league pitchers in strikeouts, boasts a 2.82 ERA, a 1.06 WHIP and an 8-3 record, and the All-Star Game is being held at his home park.    Weaver may be the biggest snub of them all. 

Stephen Strasburg, SP, Nationals

As long as the All-Star Game determines home field advantage for the World Series, it should be treated as a serious contest and not a spectacle or an exhibition.  Strasburg has proven six times now that he is already one of the top pitchers in the majors, let alone the National League.  He has 53 strikeouts in 36.2 innings, a 1.06 WHIP and a 2.45 ERA.  If Manuel and Co. want to win this thing, why leave the game’s best young arm off the roster?

Rafael Soriano, RP, Rays

Soriano has quitely put together a dominant first half down in Tampa Bay and can claim a 1.52 ERA, a 0.74 WHIP and 20 saves in 21 chances as of July 3.  He has done everything the Rays have asked and his ability to keep hitters off balance with a slick fastball-slider arsenal would be ideal for the late innings of the Midsummer Classic.

Mike Pelfrey, SP, Mets

His peripheral numbers could be better, but there is no doubt that Pelfrey has kept the Mets alive in the NL East and deserves a spot on his league’s All-Star roster.  The 26-year-old stands 10-2 with a 2.93 ERA, a 1.29 WHIP and a 66/35 K/BB ratio over 104.1 frames.  He would an ideal innings eater if the game were to run late.

Jaime Garcia, SP, Cardinals

The impressive rookie has snapped first-year pitching records in St. Louis this season with a 2.10 ERA, a 1.22 WHIP and 77 strikeouts over his first 94.1 innings.  The Cardinals surely don’t mind that he didn’t make the cut because they’re going to have to limit his workload rather soon, but Garcia is certainly deserving of recognition as one of the first half’s finest starters.

The Padres’ pitching staff

It is July 4, a time to celebrate the birth of our nation, show support for our troops and feast on massive amounts of barbecue.  It’s also time to recognize that the Padres — yes, those khaki-wearing fellows — sit atop the National League West with a 48-33 record. 

The Friars will be represented later this month only by Adrian Gonzalez, and yet it is the San Diego pitching staff that has kept this team ticking.  Mat Latos has a 2.62 ERA, a 0.96 WHIP and 91 strikeouts in 16 starts.  Clayton Richard has a 2.74 ERA and a 1.27 WHIP in 16 starts.  Luke Gregerson owns one of the game’s best sliders and has twirled it for a 51/6 K/BB ratio and a 0.60 WHIP over 40.1 innings.  All three of ’em might have made the cut in another year, and under a different system of determining what it means to be an “All-Star.”

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.