Minor leaguers have a hard time keeping weight on

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Rob Neyer has noted on several occasions that baseball is penny wise and pound foolish, usually as it relates to paying and generally looking after minor leaguers.  A big part of that is nutrition, which we hear about once a year or so when minor league meal allowances are reported.  It’s not much money and the food it buys is pretty pathetic.  Basically, any nutrition plan that all but explicitly calls for regular runs for the border is suspect.

There’s an interesting report from Zach Levine in the Houston Chronicle today about the consequences of such a lazy approach to feeding the prospects. The upshot: They lose weight and with it power as the season progresses.

Not that this is all baseball’s fault. I mean, we are dealing with boys between the ages of 18 and 22 and if there’s a demographic that makes poorer choices than boys that age I have yet to encounter it. Christ, even my son will eat an apple once in a while. You pull a bus full of broke minor leaguers into a Krystal’s parking lot and you got yourself a full-fledged natural disaster on your hands.

I realize that on any minor league team there are, like, four guys the organization really cares about with the rest constituting roster filler, but you’d think that baseball teams would want to pay closer attention to this stuff and make sure their investments aren’t eating chalupas and chili fries all the time.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.