The downside of hustle: Luke Scott injured on home run trot

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Luke Scott may be headed to the disabled list after injuring his hamstring last night during his home run trot. Scott took Cedrick Bowers deep to left-center field in the seventh inning, but ran hard out of the box before knowing it was gone and pulled up lame after rounding first base.
MLB.com has the video of Scott barely making it to the plate by hopping and limping his way to second base and actually pausing for a moment once he reached third base. Scott said afterward that “it doesn’t look good” and he’ll likely undergo an MRI exam today, guessing that he’s “probably” bound for the DL because “any time you deal with a pulled hamstring it’s going to be at least two weeks.”
Felix Pie is just about ready to return from his own DL stint, so he’d likely take Scott’s roster spot and playing time. Scott’s batting average was below .200 as late as May 9, but he’s hit .328 with eight homers and 12 doubles in 40 games since then to raise his overall AVG/OBP/SLG line to .274/.348/.520, which would be the 32-year-old’s best production since his rookie season.
Signed to a one-year, $4.05 million deal and arbitration eligible again next season, Scott figured to be a potential trade deadline target for contenders in need of a veteran left-handed bat, but any more than a couple weeks on the DL could make it tough for the Orioles to get value for him before July 31.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.