The Phillie Phanatic is sued. Again.

6 Comments

I’m not sure what’s more entertaining: the fact that the Phillie Phanatic gets sued all the time or the fact that the plaintiff’s lawyer in this latest case — arising out of the Phanatic’s antics at a minor league game at Reading — seems to be doing a pretty good job of humanizing, er, Phanaticising the defendant:

Even the woman’s attorney, John Speicher, of Wyomissing, said that
people around him have said that “this is like suing Santa Claus.”

“I’m expecting him to come to a deposition, stick his stomach and his
tongue out at me and not say anything,” Speicher said . . .

. . . Speicher agreed that the Phanatic is more “engaging and interactive”
than the mascots typically seen at Reading Phillies games. “Their mascot is Screwball, and it’s like he’s on Valium,” Speicher
said. “They say Screwball has the energy of Perry Como.”

He also sued in Philly rather than in Reading, where the alleged incident occurred. Which while not totally silly — city juries may be more plaintiff-friendly than smaller town juries — is a bit counter-intuitive, because you don’t want to let your defendant have home field advantage.

Sue in Reading and the Phanatic will be on his ATV, going back and forth to court appearance, all the time.

Report: Mets offer managerial position to Mickey Callaway

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Mets have reportedly offered their managerial position to Indians’ pitching coach Mickey Callaway, according to multiple reports from the New York Post’s Joel Sherman and the Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal. The three-year deal was accepted and is expected to be finalized today, though the team has yet to make an official announcement.

Callaway, 42, got his start in coaching back in 2010 for the Indians’ Single-A affiliate, where he helped the Lake County Captains to their first Midwest League title. He was promoted to a coaching position in High-A in 2011 and finally advanced to a big league role in 2013, where he helped guide the Indians’ pitching staff through five winning seasons and three postseason runs. Their success serves as a ringing endorsement: they’ve consistently ranked among the top ten rotations in MLB and led the league with a collective 23.1 fWAR and second-best 3.52 ERA in 2017.

The timing couldn’t be better for the Mets, whose cadre of powerhouse pitchers has weathered numerous injuries to Noah Syndergaard (torn right lat muscle), Matt Harvey (stress reaction in right shoulder), Zack Wheeler (stress reaction in right arm) and Steven Matz (ulnar nerve irritation) over the last year. While they’re preparing to take on a manager with no prior managerial experience, it doesn’t look like that’ll be an issue for Callaway.