White Sox reportedly targeting Nationals slugger Adam Dunn

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Last week general manager Mike Rizzo said the Nationals were “looking into” a contract extension for impending free agent Adam Dunn and “have been talking about it since spring training.”
Dunn has made it clear that he’d like to remain in Washington beyond his current two-year, $20 million contract, but my sense has been that the Nationals aren’t sure if they really want to make a long-term commitment to an over-30, should-be designated hitter.
All of which is why today’s report from Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times that the White Sox are pursuing a trade for Dunn is no shocker. They looked like a team in turmoil and were seemingly on the verge of selling off their own veterans just a few weeks ago, but after starting the season 24-33 the White Sox have won 15 of 18 games to pull within two games in the AL Central.
Chicago’s impressive run has been based mostly on excellent starting pitching, as the offense ranks just 10th in scoring. Production from the designated hitter spot has been particularly bad, with a rotating cast of eight different players led by Mark Kotsay and Andruw Jones combining to hit just .218 with a .293 on-base percentage and .371 slugging percentage in 66 games. In other words, Dunn would be a perfect fit.
Dunn tends to be underrated by people who focus on his strikeouts and overrated by people who ignore his bad defense, but his overall production has been outstanding regardless of how often he’s made contact and moving to the AL would allow him to ditch the glove entirely. Dunn is on pace for a seventh straight year with 35-plus homers and ranks eighth in the NL with a .925 OPS that’s just slightly above his .904 career mark.
White Sox general manager Ken Williams has a long history of bold moves and adding Dunn at a spot where the team has been among the worst in baseball would make a huge impact.

David Ortiz and Kris Bryant win 2016 Hank Aaron Awards

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 26:  (L-R) Kris Bryant #17 of the Chicago Cubs, Major League Baseball Hall of Famer 2016 Hank Aaron, Commissioner of Baseball Rob Manfred and David Ortiz #34 of the Boston Red Sox pose during the Hank Aaron Award ceremony prior to Game Two of the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field on October 26, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball announced on Wednesday that former Red Sox DH David Ortiz and Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant won the 2016 Hank Aaron Award in their respective leagues.

Ortiz, 40, flourished in his final season, batting .315/.401/.620 with 38 home runs and 127 RBI in 626 plate appearances during the regular season. His .620 slugging percentage, 1.021 OPS, and 48 doubles led the majors while his 127 RBI led the American League. Ortiz also won the Hank Aaron Award back in 2005.

Bryant, 24, is the likely winner of the National League Most Valuable Player Award as well. He hit .292/.385/.554 with 39 home runs and 102 RBI over 699 plate appearances. He also led the league by scoring 121 runs. Bryant is the first Cub to win the Hank Aaron Award since Aramis Ramirez in 2008.

Last year’s winners in the AL and NL, respectively, were Josh Donaldson and Bryce Harper.

Alex Rodriguez is taking his analyst role quite seriously

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 12: Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees answers question in a press conference after the game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on August 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
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If you’ve happened to catch any of the coverage of the 2016 postseason on Fox and FS1, you’ve heard former Yankees DH Alex Rodriguez as part of an analyst panel with host Kevin Burkhardt and former major leaguers Pete Rose and Frank Thomas. Rodriguez has drawn rave reviews not just for passing a rather low bar we set for former athletes-turned-commentators, but because he’s adding real insight drawn both from his playing days and from doing research.

Indeed, Rodriguez is taking his new job as an analyst quite seriously, Newsday’s Neil Best reports. Bardia Shah-Rais, the VP of production for Fox, said of Rodriguez, “This is not a hobby for him. It’s not a parachute in. He’s invested. If we have a noon meeting, he’s there at 11:30 a.m. He’s emailing story ideas in the morning. He wants research. He’s almost all-in to the point where it’s annoying.”

Rose also praised Rodriguez, saying, “You’ve never been around a guy who prepares more than Alex does. Alex does his homework. He knows the game. He understands players. He’s into the deal . . . Frank does a great job in preparation, too. I’m the only one that don’t prepare as much as these two guys. I don’t know if that’s because I can’t write or what it is. But these guys do their homework and they ask questions and they ask the right questions and then you put that in with our experience, all the things we’ve been through and how good we get along with each other, that’s why it shows up on the TV.”

Rodriguez, who hasn’t officially retired despite not having played since the Yankees released him in mid-August, wouldn’t commit to more TV work beyond this year’s postseason.