What the heck is going on with Valentine and the Marlins?

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The only thing we know for sure is that Edwin Rodriguez is still the manager of the Marlins. Which, given what I said the other day about the whole Puerto Rico thing, is nice.  Otherwise: pure chaos.

As Drew chronicled last night in a series of updates that reflects just how wacky the situation is down in Miami, Bobby Valentine is no longer being considered for the Marlins’ job. Probably, anyway.  Late last night Ken Rosenthal reported what everyone else is saying — the deal is off — but added one little tidbit: the dispute between Valentine and the club was apparently not about money. Rather, it was about “philosophy.”

That could mean anything. As Rosenthal notes, there appears to be some dissent between Loria and team president David Samson, the latter of which is not a Valentine fan. It could also have to do with timing and the leaks of his impending hiring and any number of things. Loria is apparently nuts and Valentine has never been accused of being some kind of ego-free zen master, so it could have broken down over the backdrop for the press conference for all we know.

What we do know, however, is that the Marlins are a train wreck at the moment. Rosenthal sums it up the best: “At best, the Marlins are confused. At worst, they are in turmoil. Either
way, they are an embarrassment.”  He also calls Loria a “low-rent George Steinbrenner.” That made me laugh, but I don’t think you can divorce Steinbrenner’s, um, colorful nature from his high-rent ways. He thought he could — and often did — buy whatever he wanted. That’s pretty much what characterized everything he did and what made him the unique phenomenon that he was, for good and for bad.  Loria, on the other hand, is just a jerk and a cheapskate and those are really a dime a dozen.

But back to the Marlins: who would possibly want that job now?

Erasmo Ramirez to be shut down with a minor lat strain

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Mariners right-hander Erasmo Ramirez has been shut down for two weeks with a minor lat strain, reports Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times. It’s a precautionary move, as Ramirez felt some tightness in his arm and could not complete his scheduled bullpen session on Saturday.

There’s no word yet on whether Ramirez will be able to recover in time for the start of the season, though he’s expected to claim a rotation spot again this spring. The 28-year-old righty has been dogged by injuries throughout his six-year career, but finally managed to piece together a full season on the mound in back-to-back stints with the Rays and Mariners in 2017. He went 5-6 in 19 starts for the two clubs and turned in a cumulative 4.39 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 7.5 SO/9 through 131 1/3 innings.

The Mariners are no stranger to pitcher injuries, either. They lost a number of their top arms to various elbow, arm and shoulder injuries last year and cycled through 40 total pitchers as they limped toward a 78-84 finish. Comments from club manager Scott Servais indicate that the team will keep a close eye on Ramirez throughout his recovery, though Divish notes that right-hander Andrew Moore and lefty Ariel Miranda could also slot into the no. 5 spot if Ramirez experiences further setbacks.