The next 300-game winner? How about Jamie Moyer?

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When Tom Glavine won his 300th game in 2007 dozens of short-sighted columnists wrote about how he’d be “the last 300-game winner.” He wasn’t, of course. In fact, less than two years later Randy Johnson won his 300th, which resulted in even more columns claiming he’d be the last to join the club.
One of my many pet peeves is the increasing tendency to say something is either “the greatest thing ever” or “the last thing ever” because usually neither is true. In the case of 300 wins it’s silly to think no one will ever accomplish that feat again when multiple pitchers who began their careers in the 1980s–with the same five-man rotations and similar workloads–have done so. As they say, ever is a really long time.
Glavine joined the club in 2007, followed by Johnson in 2009, and before that it was Greg Maddux in 2004 and Roger Clemens in 2003. There will be more 300-game winners, but it may take a while because Jamie Moyer is the only active pitcher with as many as 240 wins. Or maybe Moyer can actually become the next 300-game winner. He tossed seven innings of two-run ball against the Blue Jays yesterday for his 267th victory.
Obviously at age 47 even 33 more wins is a lot to ask for, but Moyer probably has a better chance than most people seem to believe. Which is basically to say he has some chance. Moyer is 9-6 with a 4.30 ERA this season and we’re not quite at the halfway point, so he looks capable of another 6-8 wins in the second half. That would leave him about 25 wins short of 300.
He’s not under contract for next season and that hurts, because 47-year-olds can collapse in a hurry and we’ve seen several elderly stars go unsigned in recent years. However, if Moyer finishes this year with 15 wins and a sub-4.50 ERA presumably the Phillies would welcome him back on a one-year deal that could get him into the 285-290 range heading into 2012.
At that point he’d be 49 years old and Moyer isn’t exactly dominant enough that he can stand to see his skills decline much more and remain effective, but once a pitcher gets into the “countdown” range of 285-290 wins they usually stick around long enough to reach 300. In fact, only five pitchers since 1900 have more than 275 wins but fewer than 300 wins. Moyer as a 300-game winner? It’s not as crazy as you might think.

Nationals Acquire Ryan Raburn From White Sox

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The Washington Nationals have acquired outfielder Ryan Raburn from the Chicago White Sox. Raburn had been playing at Triple-A Charlotte. He’ll be assigned to Triple-A Syracuse in the Nats organization. The Nationals will send cash or a player to be named later to the White Sox to complete the deal.

Raburn has yet to play in the majors this season. Last year he hit .220/.309/.404 with nine homers in 113 games for the Colorado Rockies. The year before that he hit an excellent .301/.393/.543 in part time play for the Indians. Over the course of his 11 year career the 36-year-old has hit .253/.317/.436, which breaks down to an OPS+ of exactly 100, which is league average. Primarily an outfielder, Raburn has played every position except shortstop and catcher in his career. He’s even pitched twice.

The Nats plans for him aren’t entirely clear, but depth it depth.

If the Tigers are sub-.500 at the end of June it’ll be fire sale time

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Jon Morosi reports that that the Detroit Tigers will make all veterans available via trade if they’re still under .500 by the end of June.

This was the position they entered the offseason with — everyone is available! — but they ended up gearing up for one more push with the core of veterans they currently employ. It was not a bad move, I don’t think. With the exception of the Indians, the AL Central is mostly down, or at least appeared to be over the winter, with the Royals in decline and the Twins and White Sox seemingly a few years away from contention. The Twins, however, have been fantastic and the Tigers have mostly underachieved.

So we’re back to this. Which veterans the Tigers can reasonably unload, however, is an open question. J.D. Martinez is in his walk year, so while tradable, he may not bring back a big return. Guys like Justin Upton, Justin Verlander and Miguel Cabrera either have very large contracts or no-trade protection.

The end of June is still a while from now, of course, and while the Tigers are under .500, they’re only 4.5 games behind the Twins. But they had better turn it around or else it sounds like the front office is going to turn the page.