And That Happened: Thursday's Scores and Highlights


Sox 13, Rockies 11
: Laser show: Dustin Pedroia: 5 for 5 with three
homers including the game winner in the tenth. Torture session: This
game: four hours and forty-eight minutes and not a decent pitching
performance in sight. Deja vu: Jonathan Papelbon: blowing a save and
giving up a couple of runs.

Phillies 12, Indians 3: Like I said yesterday, I think Charlie Manuel deliberately got himself run from this one because it was hot, he knew the storms were coming, he knew the Indians weren’t gonna offer much of a challenge and he’d rather be back in the clubhouse hoistin’ the moist. As it was, Polanco, Utley and Werth all hit the cover off the ball, Joe Blanton was solid and not much help was needed from the bullpen. I guess that means the Phillies are back on track.

Brewers 5, Twins 0: Gallardo was on, the Twins’ bats were dormant and the Brewers complete the sweep. Which would all be well and good if . . .

White Sox 2, Braves 0:  . . . the White Sox weren’t storming up the hillside like some crazed horde. They sweep Atlanta, who can sort of identify with Minnesota at the moment as a team that similarly can’t get its mojo workin’ and is in danger of falling out of first place.

Tigers 6, Mets 5: But if the Braves fall out, it won’t be before tonight. Atlanta keeps its half game lead because Hisanori Takahashi just didn’t have his mojo workin’ (4 IP, 8 H, 6 ER, 4 BB).  After he was gone the Mets bullpen took care of business, but the rally never came in earnest.

Blue Jays 5, Cardinals 0: The Jays jumped on Adam Wainwright for five runs on six hits — three of them dingers, two of those by Vernon Wells — in four innings, sending that tall drink of water to the showers earlier than he had left in any game since September 2008.

Astros 7, Giants 5: Matt Cain got jumped on as well, getting pummeled even worse than Wainwright did (2.2 IP, 9 H, 7 ER). In contrast, Wandy Rodriguez snapped out of whatever funk he’s been in all year, only allowing a couple of unearned runs in his six innings.

Cubs 3, Mariners 2: Thank goodness the M’s lost, because if they somehow get themselves back in the race they won’t trade Cliff Lee and that’s dozens of would-be rumor-trafficking blog posts I’ll never get to write.

Rays 5, Padres 3: The Rays salvage one. Padres manager Bud Black said after the game that he wants you, he needs you, but there ain’t no way he’s ever gonna love you, now don’t be sad, ’cause “two out of three on the road in this environment against this club, a
good feat accomplished.”  OK, I may have paraphrased the bit before the quotation marks, but I’m pretty sure that’s what he was driving at.

Orioles 11, Marlins 5: Both of these teams were interested in getting Bobby Valentine as their manager. The loser won. The loser of this game, I mean. Valentine? Oh, he’s aces.

Dodgers 10, Angels 6: The Dodgers finally break their losing skid at six games. More bad baserunning in this one, with Reggie Willits getting nailed in a rundown between third and home and Bobby Abreu getting thrown out at third trying to advance on a pitch in the dirt. Abreu was also caught stealing once, but it happens. What doesn’t happen: Jamey Carroll was called safe at second base when sliding in after advancing on an Andre Ethier comebacker. He assumed he was out, though, wandered off the bag on his way back to the dugout and was tagged out.  After the game Joe Torre and Mike Scioscia sent notes home with all the players asking the moms and dads if it’s OK for them to stay late for extra practice tomorrow.

Rangers 6, Pirates 5: Eleven wins in a row for the Rangers, this one on a walkoff RBI single by Vlad.  Bankruptcy schmankruptcy. Maybe the Rangers don’t need to make any moves at all.

Theo Epstein on sportswriters: “The life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself…”

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 07:  Chicago Cubs general manager Theo Epstein stands on the field during batting practice before the game between the Chicago Cubs and the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field on October 7, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Rick Morissey of the Chicago Sun-Times published an article on Sunday giving a bit of insight into Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein. When Epsten was younger, he dabbled in sportswriting, but quickly realized the trade wasn’t for him.

As Morissey details, when Epstein was 19 years old writing for Yale’s student newspaper, he wrote an article suggesting the school’s football coach should be fired during what would become a 3-7 season. Epstein was told during the meeting that one writer would defend the coach and one would call for his job. “It was a lesson in the way that the world of journalism sometimes works. It was an eye-opener for me. I regret it, and I’ve happily moved on.”

Epstein continued, “I realized I didn’t want to be a sportswriter when I was interning with the Orioles back in ’92, ’93, ’94. I did do a lot of media-relations stuff, and I saw that the life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself in the press box, go back to the hotel bar. Not to generalize.” He added, “But I really respect writing and respect sportswriters.”

He’s not wrong, and he seems to have found his calling as a front office executive. His Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.