The Rays want out of St. Petersburg

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Rays’ owner Stuart Sternberg said yesterday what everyone has known for a long time: the Rays simply aren’t viable in St. Petersburg.  Certainly not in Tropicana Field and probably not even if those cool stadium plans the Rays came up with a couple of years ago — but which the city rejected — ever came to fruition.

Which they now never will, because Sternberg says that, to be viable, the Rays likely have to be across the bridge in Tampa. Hard to say if even that would make the Rays viable. Tampa is turning into a Yankees town, I hear.

I think the most interesting aspect of this — which is kind of buried in the story — is that Sternberg is basically asking the whole region to woo him as if he were the owner of a team in another city looking to move into the area:

“If we weren’t here, how would people treat us?” Sternberg said
wistfully. “I think that’s how I’d like to see this community react. If
we weren’t here, I think it would take a regional effort to get us
here.”

But you are there, Stuart, and you have a lease to an ugly old dome that no one forced you to sign (or, rather, assume when you bought the team), so you can’t expect to sit back and wait for everyone to cater to your leverage-free butt as if you were gifting them something.

Not that I don’t sympathize — the Rays are in a lousy spot — but in case Sternberg hasn’t noticed, the unemployment rate in the Tampa-St. Pete area is close to 12% and property values are in the dumper. To expect the area to pony up a minimum of a quarter of a billion dollars to build you a ballpark in this environment is not realistic.

Personally I think this is step one — the pledge of local loyalty — to Sternberg moving the team out of the Tampa Bay area entirely. If and when the region doesn’t woo him like he wants to be wooed, he’ll move on, saying that he gave them all a chance.

Where to move? I dunno, but Sternberg himself says there are “at least five” better cities in the U.S. that don’t currently have baseball teams and, I’m assuming anyway, could have baseball teams without running afoul of baseball’s established territories. Let’s see, Vegas (which I don’t think is viable for reasons I’ve said before) . . . Portland (which won’t even bother to keep its AAA team) . . . Charlotte . . . OK, I give up, Stuart, which five do you mean?

Report: J.D. Martinez signing delayed by medical issue

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The Red Sox reportedly inked free agent outfielder J.D. Martinez to a five-year, $110 million contract last Monday, but there appears to be a slight hitch in the process. According to a report from Evan Drellich of NBC Sports Boston, the team is sorting through a medical issue that has delayed the signing. The specific nature of the issue has yet to be revealed, though Drellich adds that both the team and agent Scott Boras have involved additional medical experts in the process.

For what it’s worth, Martinez remained fairly healthy during his 2017 run with the Tigers and Diamondbacks. The 30-year-old outfielder spent six weeks on the disabled list after suffering a right foot sprain during camp, but managed to make a full recovery by mid-May and didn’t relapse once throughout the rest of the year. Of course, the medical issue holding up his new contract could be of an entirely different nature.

While spring training is already underway for the rest of the Red Sox, club manager Alex Cora doesn’t appear too concerned by Martinez’s absence — yet. “The thing I can do is my thing,” he told MLB.com’s Ian Browne. “My job here is to show up every day and get ’em ready.”