Judge's ruling means creditors could block Rangers sale

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The judge in the Texas Rangers bankruptcy case ruled today and — contrary to the statements he made from the bench last week in which he suggested he was leaning in the Rangers’ favor — held that the creditors’ interests are “imparied” by the bankruptcy plan. That means they can vote to accept or reject the prepackaged plan that the team had come up with. Of course, the creditors have said they would reject the
prepackaged plan, so unless something dramatic happens soon, they probably will.

I haven’t read the entire decision yet — Maury’s got it in case you’re interested — and I will obviously update with nuances that matter, but the upshot of this is that the plan for the Rangers to emerge from bankruptcy quickly (i.e. before the trading deadline) is in serious jeopardy. It also means that the whole sale of the team to Chuck Greenberg and Nolan Ryan could unravel, and the team could be put up for bid again. Obviously if the team doesn’t emerge from bankruptcy and isn’t sold before the end of July the Rangers will be in no position to make any big moves before the deadline.

That sound you hear is every Rangers fan in the world screaming bloody murder to the heavens above.  Once they get done venting, however, they should refocus those screams at Tom Hicks because he’s the one that got everything in such a mess to begin with.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.