Joe Maddon doesn't mind losing the DH

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Rays’ manager Joe Maddon has played a bunch of games in NL parks lately, and he’s rather enamored of the style of play. So enamored, in fact, that he’s getting rather cavalier about losing his DH via substituting him in on defense in the middle of a game:

“The thing that I’ve really played with a lot this year is there’s
really no reason why you can’t put your DH in the game in an American
League game. The fact that he can play defense, that’s one
thing we have going for us. Whoever DHs for us is able to play a
position and play it pretty well, actually.

“I’ve become more comfortable with that this year. It really expands your bench further, where you don’t have to minimize
your movements. You can leave this guy in the game. You can move the
pitcher’s spot around and you have plenty of options to choose from to
pinch-hit for that pitcher if he happens to show up later.”

I’m glad that Maddon has seen the light on National League play and everything, but let’s be clear about something: if you’re given a DH slot, you probably need to use it and probably should avoid forfeiting it if at all possible.

The only situation where I can see being casual with the DH is when you have a good-hitting catcher that you want to rest up.  Typically, AL managers simply give the catcher the day off rather than DHing him because they want to be able to use him on defense if the backup gets hurt or something.  If I have a Joe Mauer, however, I’d much rather play him at DH and risk an at bat or two by a pitcher in the event of a catcher injury rather than risk losing three or four Joe Mauer at bats.

Josh Donaldson is still seeking a long-term deal with the Blue Jays

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If it were up to him, Blue Jays third baseman Josh Donaldson would finish the remainder of his career in Toronto. In fact, he’d be “ticked pink” if the club decided to sign him to a long-term deal. Whether the Blue Jays share that sentiment is still unclear, as Donaldson said Saturday that the team has yet to engage his agent in extension talks.

“I’ve said that I wanted to be here,” he told MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm. “That’s pretty much all I can say. I’m not the one who makes the decisions, nor would I try to put them in the position to do that. Like I said, I believe the situation will become more fluid when the time is right.”

That doesn’t necessarily mean an extension is out of the question. The Blue Jays reached an unprecedented one-year, $23 million agreement with the three-time All-Star in arbitration, and have been reticent to field trade offers despite continued interest from the Cardinals this winter.

Donaldson, 32, is poised to enter his eighth season in the majors and fourth with the Blue Jays. In 2017, he batted .270/.385/.559 with 33 home runs and a .944 OPS in 496 plate appearances, ranking sixth among all major league third baseman with 5.0 fWAR. He’s scheduled to enter free agency following the 2018 season.