Correction of the Day: The Washington Post


When bloggers screw something up we try our best to fix it in the main article so that the best information is out there where the most people can see it. Newspapers can’t just reprint, however, so they have to do hilarious little corrections like this one:

The Tracee Hamilton column in the June 19 Sports section, about
Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg, incorrectly referred to
former Houston Astros pitcher J.R. Richard as deceased. Richard, whose
record for most strikeouts in a pitcher’s first three starts was broken
by Strasburg, is alive.

I guess it’s not so hilarious, really. The fact that even a sports section of a major daily newspaper has lost track of J.R. Richard — who was once truly great and on the road to even greater things before suffering a career-ending stroke in his prime — is pretty sad.

Here’s a lot more J.R. Richard information for you, complete with details of his often tragic post-baseball life. I was seven when his career ended. Just before that, I was convinced that he was the greatest pitcher in all of baseball.

(thanks to Kevin Reiss for the heads up)

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”