Projecting the 2010 AL All-Star team


With rosters having been expanded back in April, both All-Star teams this year will have 21 position players and 13 pitchers. Let’s try and break it down, first with the AL and then tomorrow with the NL.
Lock: Joe Mauer
Possibilities: Victor Martinez, Jorge Posada, John Buck, Kurt Suzuki
Posada is playing as well as ever, with a .275/.348/.600 line to date. However, he’s taken part in just 42 games and started at catcher in only 25 of those. Plus, manager Joe Girardi may figure it’s best for the Yankees if Posada gets three full days off rather than taking part in the All-Star festivities. That might make Martinez the favorite here.
First base
Locks: Justin Morneau, Miguel Cabrera
Possibilities: Kevin Youkilis, Paul Konerko, Mark Teixeira, Billy Butler
Morneau, Cabrera and Youkilis rank first, second and third, respectively, in the AL in OPS. I think that makes Youkilis close to a lock, particularly with the DH available. The AL could even go with a fourth first baseman, probably Konerko. He ranks sixth in OPS and third in homers.
Teixeira is listed simply because he might yet claim the fan balloting over Morneau. Still, that ship has likely sailed.
Second base
Lock: Robinson Cano
Possibilities: Dustin Pedroia, Ty Wigginton, Ben Zobrist, Orlando Hudson, Howie Kendrick
Pedroia’s recent rebound has given him the third-best numbers among AL second basemen, behind Cano and Wigginton. Wigginton is the obvious choice to represent the Orioles, though actually sticking him at second base in the All-Star Game would be a mistake. Really more of a corner infielder, he’s given back a lot of his offensive value while being asked to fill in for Brian Roberts at second.
Third base
Lock: Evan Longoria
Possibilities: Alex Rodriguez, Adrian Beltre, Jose Bautista, Michael Young
Among AL third basemen, Longoria, Beltre and Bautista rank first, second and third, respectively, in both OPS and RBI. A-Rod seemed to be surging a few weeks ago, but he’s struggling since retuning from a hip injury and is down to .277/.349/.459 for the season. Still, he is A-Rod and he probably deserves to go.
Lock: Derek Jeter
Possibilities: Alex Gonzalez, Marco Scutaro, Elvis Andrus
Gonzalez’s 802 OPS is easily tops among AL shortstops, with Jeter (760) and Scutaro (742) next in line. Andrus, the best fielder in the group, is at 681, but his 360 OPS is the best in the league and he’s swiped 19 bases. He’d be a more worthy choice than Scutaro if the team carries three shortstops.
Lock: Ichiro Suzuki
Possibilites: Carl Crawford, Josh Hamilton, Torii Hunter, Magglio Ordonez, Alex Rios, Nelson Cruz, Vernon Wells, Nick Swisher, David DeJesus, Luke Scott, Delmon Young, Shin-Soo Choo, Brennan Boesch
Here’s where it gets messy. Crawford and Hamilton are currently second and third in the balloting and both deserve to go anyway, so they’re close to locks. Cruz has been the AL’s best outfielder when healthy, but he’s played in just 32 of 69 games. That would seem to rule him out, but he’s fourth in the balloting, and since Hamilton seems likely to be picked anyway, maybe the fans will make even more of a push to get him in.
Hunter and Rios would seem to be the best bets beyond Ichiro, Crawford and Hamilton. Hunter, who is fourth among AL outfielders in OPS, could conceivably be the only Angel on the team. Rios is second on the OPS list behind Hamilton. Ordonez is third, but he doesn’t have the sexy power numbers.
Choo isn’t having a stellar year, but he’s the obvious choice to represent the Indians. DeJesus, with his 892 OPS, actually is having an All-Star caliber year, and he could be the Royals’ rep, though Joakim Soria and Butler are also deserving.
Lock: Vladimir Guerrero
Possibilities: David Ortiz, Jose Guillen
It’s possible Ortiz will go, maybe as the fan-balloting pick for the last roster spot. Still, he can’t be chosen over a third first baseman. Guillen would only be considered as the long Royal, and there are several better choices there.
SP possibilities: David Price, Clay Buchholz, Jon Lester, Cliff Lee, Phil Hughes, Justin Verlander, CC Sabathia, Andy Pettitte, Jered Weaver, Jeff Niemann, Francisco Liriano, Colby Lewis, Ricky Romero, John Danks, Shawn Marcum, Felix Hernandez, Carl Pavano, Zack Greinke
RP possibilities: Mariano Rivera, Jose Valverde, Jonathan Papelbon, Rafael Soriano, Joakim Soria, Neftali Feliz, Jon Rauch, Andrew Bailey, Daniel Bard, Joel Zumaya, Matt Guerrier, Matt Thornton, Scott Downs, Darren Oliver
Of course, so much of this will come down to who pitches the final Sunday before the game. Several starting pitchers could be taken out of the running then.
The relievers are easier to figure. Rivera is a lock, and Valverde seems on his way, too. I listed the three lefties last. It’d make sense for the team to carry at least one of them, particularly since there are few closers having extraordinary seasons.
OK, it’s guessing time…
The 2010 AL All-Stars

RF Ichiro Suzuki
SS Derek Jeter
C Joe Mauer
1B Justin Morneau
DH Vladimir Guerrero
2B Robinson Cano
CF Josh Hamilton
3B Evan Longoria
LF Carl Crawford
C Victor Martinez
1B Miguel Cabrera
1B Kevin Youkilis
2B Dustin Pedroia
2B Ty Wigginton
3B Alex Rodriguez
3B Jose Bautista
SS Alex Gonzalez
OF Torii Hunter
OF Alex Rios
OF David DeJesus
OF Shin-Soo Choo
David Price
Clay Buchholz
Jon Lester
Cliff Lee
Phil Hughes
CC Sabathia
Jered Weaver
Mariano Rivera
Jose Valverde
Jonathan Papelbon
Rafael Soriano
Andrew Bailey
Matt Thornton

Pirates sign outfielder/first baseman Jake Goebbert

Jake Goebbert
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The best thing about minor Thanksgiving week transactions is that they are almost certainly done by GMs frantically looking for some work to do rather than go pick up their in-laws at the airport. I mean, sure, the player in question could very easily be an important player who fills a key role in the organization, but it’s not like it couldn’t have waited until Monday, right? This is the GM equivalent of you pretending you have to run into the office on Wednesday afternoon and, in reality, driving around in your car, listening to Neil Young and promising that NEXT YEAR you’re just doing a small Thanksgiving dinner with no family and, maybe, might even go on a little trip, just you and the wife.

Or is that just me? OK, maybe that’s just me.

Anyway, that’s how I’m choosing to view the Pirates activity today. First they traded for Allen Webster and now they’re signing minor league free agent first baseman/outfielder Jake Goebbert, according to Adam Berry of

Goebbert, 28, hit .294 with an .844 OPS and 10 homers for Triple-A El Paso last season. He has 115 plate appearances in the bigs, all for San Diego in 2014. Overall he has a line of .282/.386/.465 with 30 homers in 997 Triple-A plate appearances in the Astros, Athletics and Padres organizations.

Not a bad depth move, especially given that the Pirates are looking to trade Pedro Alvarez and otherwise re-jigger their first base situation.

Blue Jays sell Triple-A MVP Matt Hague to Japanese team

Matt Hague Blue Jays
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Matt Hague got a cup of coffee in Toronto this year after winning the International League MVP, but the 30-year-old first baseman/third baseman found a better opportunity in Japan and the Blue Jays have sold him to the Hanshin Tigers.

Hague hit .338 in 136 games at Triple-A this past season and is a career .301 hitter in eight minor-league seasons overall, but his lack of power limits his opportunities in the majors and he’s received a grand total of 91 plate appearances as a big leaguer.

Ben Nicholson-Smith of Toronto Sportnet reports that the sale price for Hague is $300,000, which goes to the Blue Jays. And then Hague will no doubt sign a deal for a lot more than he could have earned at Triple-A and perhaps more than the MLB minimum salary.

Diamondbacks trade Allen Webster to the Pirates

Allen Webster
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The Arizona Diamondbacks just announced that have traded righty Allen Webster to the Pirates for cash considerations.

Webster, who turns 26 in February, was DFA’d by the Dbacks a few days ago. He pitched in nine games, starting five, in 2015, posting a 5.81 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 17/20 (eww) in 31 innings. Before that he pitched 89.1 innings for the Red Sox over two years with numbers not too terribly more impressive than that.

Yankees “have let teams know” Ivan Nova is available

New York Yankees starting pitcher Ivan Nova reacts during second inning where he gave up 6 runs to the Toronto Blue Jays in Game 2 of a doubleheader baseball game at Yankee Stadium, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
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Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports that the Yankees “have let teams know Ivan Nova is available” in trade.

Nova returned from Tommy John elbow surgery in May to throw 94 innings with a 5.07 ERA and will be a free agent after the 2016 season, so it’s tough to imagine his trade market being particularly robust.

Despite that, Sherman writes that the Yankees “are not selling low” on Nova and might try to package him with other players to bring back a young starting pitcher under team control for multiple seasons. In other words, they’d like to trade Nova for a pitcher who can step into his rotation spot in 2016 and beyond.

Nova has had some good years in New York, but he’s 29 years old with a career 4.33 ERA and just 6.7 strikeouts per nine innings. He’s more middle-of-the-rotation starter than front-line starter and even that might be in question following elbow surgery.