Projecting the 2010 AL All-Star team


With rosters having been expanded back in April, both All-Star teams this year will have 21 position players and 13 pitchers. Let’s try and break it down, first with the AL and then tomorrow with the NL.
Lock: Joe Mauer
Possibilities: Victor Martinez, Jorge Posada, John Buck, Kurt Suzuki
Posada is playing as well as ever, with a .275/.348/.600 line to date. However, he’s taken part in just 42 games and started at catcher in only 25 of those. Plus, manager Joe Girardi may figure it’s best for the Yankees if Posada gets three full days off rather than taking part in the All-Star festivities. That might make Martinez the favorite here.
First base
Locks: Justin Morneau, Miguel Cabrera
Possibilities: Kevin Youkilis, Paul Konerko, Mark Teixeira, Billy Butler
Morneau, Cabrera and Youkilis rank first, second and third, respectively, in the AL in OPS. I think that makes Youkilis close to a lock, particularly with the DH available. The AL could even go with a fourth first baseman, probably Konerko. He ranks sixth in OPS and third in homers.
Teixeira is listed simply because he might yet claim the fan balloting over Morneau. Still, that ship has likely sailed.
Second base
Lock: Robinson Cano
Possibilities: Dustin Pedroia, Ty Wigginton, Ben Zobrist, Orlando Hudson, Howie Kendrick
Pedroia’s recent rebound has given him the third-best numbers among AL second basemen, behind Cano and Wigginton. Wigginton is the obvious choice to represent the Orioles, though actually sticking him at second base in the All-Star Game would be a mistake. Really more of a corner infielder, he’s given back a lot of his offensive value while being asked to fill in for Brian Roberts at second.
Third base
Lock: Evan Longoria
Possibilities: Alex Rodriguez, Adrian Beltre, Jose Bautista, Michael Young
Among AL third basemen, Longoria, Beltre and Bautista rank first, second and third, respectively, in both OPS and RBI. A-Rod seemed to be surging a few weeks ago, but he’s struggling since retuning from a hip injury and is down to .277/.349/.459 for the season. Still, he is A-Rod and he probably deserves to go.
Lock: Derek Jeter
Possibilities: Alex Gonzalez, Marco Scutaro, Elvis Andrus
Gonzalez’s 802 OPS is easily tops among AL shortstops, with Jeter (760) and Scutaro (742) next in line. Andrus, the best fielder in the group, is at 681, but his 360 OPS is the best in the league and he’s swiped 19 bases. He’d be a more worthy choice than Scutaro if the team carries three shortstops.
Lock: Ichiro Suzuki
Possibilites: Carl Crawford, Josh Hamilton, Torii Hunter, Magglio Ordonez, Alex Rios, Nelson Cruz, Vernon Wells, Nick Swisher, David DeJesus, Luke Scott, Delmon Young, Shin-Soo Choo, Brennan Boesch
Here’s where it gets messy. Crawford and Hamilton are currently second and third in the balloting and both deserve to go anyway, so they’re close to locks. Cruz has been the AL’s best outfielder when healthy, but he’s played in just 32 of 69 games. That would seem to rule him out, but he’s fourth in the balloting, and since Hamilton seems likely to be picked anyway, maybe the fans will make even more of a push to get him in.
Hunter and Rios would seem to be the best bets beyond Ichiro, Crawford and Hamilton. Hunter, who is fourth among AL outfielders in OPS, could conceivably be the only Angel on the team. Rios is second on the OPS list behind Hamilton. Ordonez is third, but he doesn’t have the sexy power numbers.
Choo isn’t having a stellar year, but he’s the obvious choice to represent the Indians. DeJesus, with his 892 OPS, actually is having an All-Star caliber year, and he could be the Royals’ rep, though Joakim Soria and Butler are also deserving.
Lock: Vladimir Guerrero
Possibilities: David Ortiz, Jose Guillen
It’s possible Ortiz will go, maybe as the fan-balloting pick for the last roster spot. Still, he can’t be chosen over a third first baseman. Guillen would only be considered as the long Royal, and there are several better choices there.
SP possibilities: David Price, Clay Buchholz, Jon Lester, Cliff Lee, Phil Hughes, Justin Verlander, CC Sabathia, Andy Pettitte, Jered Weaver, Jeff Niemann, Francisco Liriano, Colby Lewis, Ricky Romero, John Danks, Shawn Marcum, Felix Hernandez, Carl Pavano, Zack Greinke
RP possibilities: Mariano Rivera, Jose Valverde, Jonathan Papelbon, Rafael Soriano, Joakim Soria, Neftali Feliz, Jon Rauch, Andrew Bailey, Daniel Bard, Joel Zumaya, Matt Guerrier, Matt Thornton, Scott Downs, Darren Oliver
Of course, so much of this will come down to who pitches the final Sunday before the game. Several starting pitchers could be taken out of the running then.
The relievers are easier to figure. Rivera is a lock, and Valverde seems on his way, too. I listed the three lefties last. It’d make sense for the team to carry at least one of them, particularly since there are few closers having extraordinary seasons.
OK, it’s guessing time…
The 2010 AL All-Stars

RF Ichiro Suzuki
SS Derek Jeter
C Joe Mauer
1B Justin Morneau
DH Vladimir Guerrero
2B Robinson Cano
CF Josh Hamilton
3B Evan Longoria
LF Carl Crawford
C Victor Martinez
1B Miguel Cabrera
1B Kevin Youkilis
2B Dustin Pedroia
2B Ty Wigginton
3B Alex Rodriguez
3B Jose Bautista
SS Alex Gonzalez
OF Torii Hunter
OF Alex Rios
OF David DeJesus
OF Shin-Soo Choo
David Price
Clay Buchholz
Jon Lester
Cliff Lee
Phil Hughes
CC Sabathia
Jered Weaver
Mariano Rivera
Jose Valverde
Jonathan Papelbon
Rafael Soriano
Andrew Bailey
Matt Thornton

Ohio Governor John Kasich Says Baseball is dying, you guys

COLUMBUS, OH - MAY 4: Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks to the media announcing he is suspending his campaign May 4, 2016 in Columbus, Ohio. Kasich is the second Republican candidate within a day to drop out of the GOP race. (Photo by J.D. Pooley/Getty Images)
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For reasons that are not entirely clear to me the governor of my state, John Kasich, was on The Dan Patrick Show today. He had some bad news, unfortunately. According to Kasich, “baseball is going to die.”

It’s based mostly on his belief that, because some clubs are rich and some clubs are not so rich, and because players make too much money, poor teams cannot compete and fans cannot find a basis for team loyalty. He cites his boyhood rooting for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the ability for fans to root for players on the same teams year-in, year-out and claims that, if you don’t root for a high-payroll team, “your team is out before the All-Star Break.” Which is demonstrably not true, but he was on a roll so Patrick let him finish.

The real issue, Kasich says, is the lack of revenue sharing in the NFL-NBA mold. He makes a reference to “my buddy Bob Castellini,” the owner of the Cincinnati Reds, and says stuff about how the Reds can’t compete with the Cubs on payroll. His buddy Bob Castellini, by the way, is worth half a billion dollars, purchased the Reds for $270 million, they’re now worth an estimated $905 million, and they just signed a lucrative new TV deal, so thoughts and prayers to his buddy Bob Castellini and the Reds.

Kasich is right that baseball does not have straight revenue sharing like the NFL and NBA do. But he’s also comically uninformed about the differences in financial structure and revenue sources for baseball teams on the one hand and other sports on the other. He talks about how NFL teams in small towns like Green Bay can do just great while the poor sisters in Cincinnati can’t do as well in baseball, but either doesn’t realize or doesn’t acknowledge that local revenue — especially local TV revenue — pales in importance in football compared to baseball. If the Packers had to make all of their money by broadcasting games to the greater Green Bay area their situation would be a lot different. Meanwhile, if the Yankees had to put all of the revenue they receive via broadcasts in the greater New York area and give it to the poorer teams, it would something less than fair, would it not?

Wait, that’s it! I realize now why my governor did not do as well in the Republican primaries as he expected to! HE’S A COMMUNIST!

Billy Williams, Bill Murray and . . . Fall Out Boy!

CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 08:  Former players Ferguson Jenkins (L) and Billy Williams of the Chicago Cubs throw out ceremonial first pitches before the Opening Day game against the Milwaukee Brewers during the Opening Day game at Wrigley Field on April 8, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball has announced the on-field ceremonial stuff for tonight’s Game 3 of the World Series. There are a couple of good things here! And one bit of evidence that, at some point when he was still commissioner, Bud Selig sold his mortal soul to a pop punk band and now the league can’t do a thing about it.

The ceremonial first pitch choice is fantastic: it’s Billy Williams, the Hall of Famer and six-time All-Star who starred for the Cubs from 1959 through 1974. Glad to see Williams here. I know he’s beloved in Chicago, but he has always seemed to be one of the more overlooked Hall of Famers of the 1960s-70s. I’m guessing not being in the World Series all that time has a lot to do with that, so it’s all the more appropriate that he’s getting the spotlight tonight. Here’s hoping Fox makes a big deal out of it and replays it after the game starts.

“Take me out to the ballgame” will be sung by the guy who, I assume, holds the title of Cubs First Fan, Bill Murray. It’ll be wacky, I’m sure.

The National Anthem will be sung by Chicago native Patrick Stump. Who, many of you may know, is the lead singer for Fall Out Boy. This continues Major League Baseball’s strangely strong association with Fall Out Boy over the years. They, or some subset of them, seem to perform at every MLB jewel event. They have featured in MLB’s Opening Day musical montages. They played at the All-Star Game this summer. Twice. And, of course, they are the creative minds behind “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark,” (a/k/a “light ’em MUPMUPMUPMUP“) which Major League Baseball and Fox used as incessant playoff bumper music several years ago. I don’t ask for much in life, but one thing I do want is someone to love me as much as Major League Baseball loves Fall Out Boy. We all do, really.

Wayne Messmer, the former public address announcer for the Cubs and a regular performer of the National Anthem at Wrigley Field will sing “God Bless America.”

Between that and Bill Murray, I think we’ve found out the Cubs strategy for dealing with Andrew Miller: icing him if he tries to straddle the 6th and 7th innings.