Hard Hittin' Mark Whiten does it again

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I watched Mark Whiten hit four homers against the Reds in 1993 and thought it was really something.  Yesterday Whiten played in the Hall of Fame Classic and hit two out, winning the game’s MVP honors. He also won the pre-game home run derby.

It’s a different game now that active major leaguers don’t play in it.  Instead it’s an all-star old timers affair. This year it was Team Harmon Killebrew against Team Bob Feller. The Fellers beat the Killers 9-0. 9-0 is also the score that is officially applied to forfeits, so without looking I’m going to assume that the game was suspended after Killebrew threw 22 bats on the field, swore a blue streak at everyone and then got into a fistfight, because that’s just the kind of guy he is.  The game story is in the first link above if you want to see what really happened. Don’t ruin it for me, though.

Anyway, among the players taking part were Whiten, Gary Carter, Goose Gossage, Rollie Fingers, Phil Niekro, Ozzie Smith, Paul Blair, Bill Madlock, Mike Pagliarulo and Jeff Kent.

Kent’s inclusion almost doesn’t seem fair given how recent it was that he retired. He played last year too and won the home run derby. Not a surprise considering he probably could have started for a dozen or two major league teams if he were so inclined. The fact that he got beat by Hard Hittin’ Mark Whiten this year made me smile a bit.

I know a lot of people raised a ruckus when they changed the Classic from a real game with major leaguers to an old timers thing a couple of years ago, but really, I think I would enjoy the old timer thing much more.

Note: an earlier version of this post referred to Mark Whiten as merely “hittin’ Mark Whiten” and not “Hard Hittin’ Mark Whiten.”  I apologize for the massive and inexcusable gaffe. I don’t bring a hell of a lot to this party, but one thing I do bring is a pretty insanely detailed knowledge of trivia relating to players whose prime fell roughly in the 1970-1995 period.  For me to whiff like that on one of those players borders on the criminal.  I’ll try to regain your trust, but I understand if this oversight was the last straw.

The Cards dealt Stephen Piscotty to the A’s, in part, so he could be near his ailing mother

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Last night we wrote about the rumored deal between the Cardinals and the Athletics for Stephen Piscotty. The deal is now official, with Piscotty going to Oakland for minor leaguers Yairo Munoz and Max Schrock.

Something else emerged about the deal today: a big reason why St. Louis traded Piscotty to Oakland as opposed to another team was so that he could be near his mother, who was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease last May. Piscotty and his family are from Pleasanton, California, about 35 miles from Oakland.

Here’s Cardinals GM John Mozeliak:

This was certainly a baseball trade — Piscotty became expendable for the Cardinals after they acquired Marcell Ozuna yesterday — but it was one which could’ve been made with any team with a couple of red or white chip prospects. That Mozeliak considered Piscotty’s personal situation in making the deal with the A’s is a credit to him and his staff.

The 26-year-old Piscotty hit .235 with nine homers and 39 RBIs in 107 games last season. He has hit .268 with 38 homers and 163 RBIs in 2+ major league seasons. He agreed to a six-year, $33.5 million contract extension last spring.

As for the prospects in return: Munoz, 22, hit .300 with 13 homers and 68 RBIs this year for Double-A Midland and Triple-A Nashville. Schrock, 23, batted .321 with seven homers and 46 RBIs for Midland, and was a Texas League All-Star.