UPDATE: Phillies designate Scott Mathieson for assignment

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UPDATE: Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer kept his promise to explain the Mathieson situation and it appears he isn’t going anywhere. Here are the specifics.

Problem is, Mathieson cannot be optioned without going on waivers.
Here is my understanding of Mathieson’s situation:

There are four types of waivers, the rarest being optional waivers.
They are required when a team wishes to option a player who has options
remaining but is more than three calendar years removed from his
major-league debut. Mathieson falls under that category; he made his
debut on June 17, 2006. And he has options left.

So the Phillies had to place Mathieson on waivers regardless. Will they
lose him? Almost certainly no. Optional waivers are revocable, which
means if a team puts a claim in for Mathieson, the Phillies can pull him
back.

Well, I’ve learned something today. How about you?

1:59 PM: Todd Zolecki of MLB.com confirms that Mathieson was designated for assignment, while Matt Gelb tweets that there is a “very small chance” that the Phillies will lose him through a loophole. My head hurts. This has nothing to do with my personal fandom, I swear, but it would be pretty entertaining to see the Mets put in a waiver claim here.

1:47 PM: Well, that was fast. Scott Mathieson was just called up from Triple-A Lehigh Valley on Friday, however he was designated for assignment on Saturday in order to make room on the roster for catcher Dane Sardinha, according to Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Mathieson reached cult hero status among some Phillies fans after multiple Tommy John surgeries, posting a 2.43 ERA and 34/12 K/BB ratio over 29 2/3 innings with the IronPigs this season, however he failed to impress in his season debut against the Twins on Friday night, allowing two runs on three hits and a wild pitch with the bases loaded in the ninth inning. The 26-year-old fireballer was yanked after throwing 23 pitches.

There’s some uncertainty as to what this roster move actually means, as Mathieson has options remaining. Assistant general manager Scott Proefrock told Gelb that it was “a procedural move,” but wouldn’t elaborate further. I’m stumped.
 

Video: Angels use eight pitchers in spring training no-hitter

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Who says no-hitters can’t be just as fun when they happen during spring training?

Angels’ right-hander Bud Norris delivered two perfect innings on Friday night, paving the way for an eight-pitcher no-hitter against the Mariners at Tempe Diablo Stadium. Jose Alvarez, Cam Bedrosian, Andrew Bailey, Austin Adams, Drew Gagnon and Justin Anderson each filed a hitless inning of their own, leaving right-hander Abel De Los Santos to close out the ninth inning with just three pitches — and three game-saving plays by the defense.

Of course, it didn’t hurt that the Angels were facing a bevy of Mariners’ backups, rather than their starting lineup. In fact, Seattle’s lineup featured just two starting players — outfielder Leonys Martin and shortstop Jean Segura — while the majority of their everyday position players took on the Royals in a 4-3 win elsewhere in the Cactus League. The Mariners managed to reach base twice, first on catcher interference in the fourth inning, then on a four-pitch walk in the sixth, spoiling the Angels’ chances of turning their combined no-hitter into a combined perfect game.

Still, whether it’s executed in spring training or the regular season, against an All-Star lineup or one comprised of minor leaguers, a no-hitter is a no-hitter. The team’s eight-pitcher effort marked the first spring training no-no the Angels had completed since 1996, when they took on the Giants in a 15-0 showdown. Unfortunately for the 1996 squad, their regular season ended with a 70-91 record, good for last place in the AL West. Perhaps this no-hitter will prove a better omen for the coming season.

Tanner Scheppers leaves Cactus League game with lower core injury

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Rangers’ bullpen candidate Tanner Scheppers left Friday’s Cactus League game with pain in his “lower half,” according to reports by Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News. The specifics of the right-hander’s injury have yet to be determined, but he was accompanied by the athletic trainer when he exited the game and is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday.

Scheppers, 30, has a long history of elbow and knee injuries. He missed all but 8 2/3 innings of the 2016 season after undergoing a procedure to repair torn articular cartilage in his left knee. While he appeared healthy enough through his first seven appearances this spring, he failed to impress with three runs, five walks and six strikeouts over 7 2/3 innings with the club.

Should Scheppers find himself on the disabled list for another lengthy stay, MLB.com’s T.R. Sullivan speculates that his absence could clear some room in the bullpen for Rule 5 draft pick and fellow righty Mike Hauschild. Hauschild, 27, has dealt seven runs, five walks and 15 strikeouts through 17 1/3 innings in camp.