News Flash: team performs worse against good teams than bad ones

6 Comments

I noticed this kicking around the Twitterverse last night and this morning, but the meme developed fully this afternoon: Oh noes! The Yankees don’t play well against good teams!

That’s the refrain from the New York Times today, which notes:

The Yankees’ struggles against better teams have received little
attention, and it is no wonder why. In recent weeks, the team has played
well over all, and the numbers seem to tell a story of a team that is
among the hottest in baseball . . . But many of those wins have come against bad teams.

I touched on this last week (and totally mangled the facts, but whatever), but the fact remains: bad baseball teams are much easier to beat than good baseball teams, and even championship baseball teams have worse records against the winners than the losers. In fact, a major league source who asked for anonymity because he’s not permitted to share such information revealed that beating good teams is much, much harder than beating bad teams.  It’s true!

But maybe saying stuff like that — or saying the thing that best describes what happened to the Yankees against the Phillies the last two nights (i.e. that the Yankees lost because they just weren’t playing well) is too boring.

It’s much more interesting to create some overarching theme that invokes mental toughness or the lack thereof than to simply chalk it up having trouble with junkballers, the bullpen pitching poorly at the wrong time and simply having the bats go to sleep.

Josh Donaldson is still seeking a long-term deal with the Blue Jays

Getty Images
1 Comment

If it were up to him, Blue Jays third baseman Josh Donaldson would finish the remainder of his career in Toronto. In fact, he’d be “ticked pink” if the club decided to sign him to a long-term deal. Whether the Blue Jays share that sentiment is still unclear, as Donaldson said Saturday that the team has yet to engage his agent in extension talks.

“I’ve said that I wanted to be here,” he told MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm. “That’s pretty much all I can say. I’m not the one who makes the decisions, nor would I try to put them in the position to do that. Like I said, I believe the situation will become more fluid when the time is right.”

That doesn’t necessarily mean an extension is out of the question. The Blue Jays reached an unprecedented one-year, $23 million agreement with the three-time All-Star in arbitration, and have been reticent to field trade offers despite continued interest from the Cardinals this winter.

Donaldson, 32, is poised to enter his eighth season in the majors and fourth with the Blue Jays. In 2017, he batted .270/.385/.559 with 33 home runs and a .944 OPS in 496 plate appearances, ranking sixth among all major league third baseman with 5.0 fWAR. He’s scheduled to enter free agency following the 2018 season.