Don't worry Steve Stone, ex-managers are now criticizing Lou Piniella too

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Lou Piniella reacted harshly (and then some) to Steve Stone last week in large part because he didn’t feel Stone was qualified to criticize him given that he’d never managed in the majors himself.

Piniella’s exact words were:

We’ve got a lot of people here that haven’t managed and won any games in the big leagues, but they know everything. You know? They really do. I think they should try to put the uniform on and try this job and see how they like it when they get criticized unjustly.

And Steve Stone? He’s got enough problems doing what he does with the White Sox. What job has he had in baseball besides talking on television or radio? What has he done? Why isn’t he a farm director and bring some kids around? Why isn’t he a general manager, and put the uniform on and been a pitching coach? Why hasn’t he been a field manager.

Bob Brenly is presumably a different story, because prior to becoming the Cubs’ television analyst he managed four seasons in the majors, with a winning record in three of those years, and won the World Series in 2001. Brenly, like Stone, has some criticism and words of advice for Piniella:

The lack of timely hitting affects every team in the major leagues at one point or another, but it’s the lack of solid fundamentals on a daily basis that really gets to me, and I think gets to a lot of fans. It’s not playing the game the way it needs to be played to give yourself a chance to win.

Asked specifically about Piniella’s decision to let Carlos Zambrano hit for himself in a key spot and then remove him from the game before the next half-inning, Brenly said:

I wasn’t particularly enamored with that move. I said it on the air, Zambrano is a good hitting pitcher, there’s no question about that. But let’s don’t get carried away. I would much rather have the worst pinch-hitter I have available off the bench up at the plate rather than any pitcher.

Brenly stopped short of calling out Piniella, instead talking about organization-wide issues, but he wouldn’t be the first color commentator to potentially line himself up to replace the manager of a struggling team he’s covering. Piniella wants to be criticized only by people who’ve done his job and now he’s getting exactly that.

J.D. Martinez tells teams he prefers an outfield role

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Free agent outfielder/slugger J.D. Martinez is reportedly seeking an outfield gig, says Michael Silverman of the Boston Herald. According to Silverman’s sources, Martinez’s suitors have been informed that the veteran slugger would give preference to teams that can offer a corner outfield spot, rather than a DH-only role.

That could spell trouble for the Red Sox, who appear to be Martinez’s biggest suitors so far this offseason. Outfielders Mookie Betts and Andrew Benintendi are firmly established at the corners, and prior reports from club president Dave Dombrowski suggest that center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. is not going anywhere anytime soon (thereby eliminating the possibility of reshuffling the outfield). The DH spot is still wide open for Martinez, who doesn’t seem to be totally closed off to the idea, but any full-time or part-time role on the field is likely off the table at this point.

Of course, the Red Sox aren’t the only ones pursuing Martinez’s services this winter. The 30-year-old slugger has been linked to both the Diamondbacks and Giants in weeks past, and while they have the roster flexibility to accommodate his preferences, they’ll need to clear another massive hurdle: the seven-year, $250 million contract he’s said to be seeking. Both clubs will need to get creative to make such a deal work. The Diamondbacks are rumored to be shopping right-hander Zack Greinke in an attempt to free up some room on their payroll for Martinez, while the Giants appear more inclined to scour the trade market for outfield help than shell out cash for another hefty contract in free agency.