Is Chase Utley injured?

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ESPN’s Buster Olney talks to a scout and an unnamed executive, each of whom think that Chase Utley’s struggles this year are because he’s injured:

Two years ago, one scout noticed in June that Utley did not seem
right, and at season’s end, Utley had hip surgery. And the same scout is
seeing a lot of the same things this season. “The tell-tale sign for me
is how he is not getting to pitches in the lower half of the strike
zone, which makes me wonder if his (perceived injury) might be affecting
his balance at the plate,” said the scout. “He’s a guy who has always
thrived on balls in the lower half of the strike zone — he murders them
— and he’s just not getting to them these days.”

Said a
rival executive: “He just does not look right to me at all.”

I have to think that of all of the things baseball players have to think about, getting their minds around the difference between playing through pain and playing hurt has to be one of the tougher ones.

For years, when you’re a young guy on the make, you get it drilled into your head that you need to be tough, that you can’t get a rep for being injury prone and all of that, and then, relatively late in your baseball life — when you become an established star — you’re immediately expected to get your brain around the idea that playing injured is a bad thing. Which it is, but it has to run counter to all of your competitive instincts.

Phillies, Jake Arrieta having a “dialogue”

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No, not like a Socratic dialogue, in which each side, in a mostly cooperative, but intellectually confrontational manner interrogate one another as a means of testing assertions and finding truths, though that would be an AMAZING thing for baseball players and teams to do. Rather, low-level talks about possible interest in Jake Arrieta, baseball free agent.

Arrieta is probably the top free agent still available, now that Yu Darvish, J.D. Martinez and Eric Hosmer have signed. Philly has money — it’s a big market — and could use a pitcher, but Jon Heyman, who, much like Plato did for Socrates, reported the dialogue, says they’re not looking to go long term with anyone.

It may make sense for Arrieta to take a so-called “pillow contract” and come back on the market in a year, but if he’s willing to accept a one-year deal, there are a lot of teams other than Philly who may offer one, and you’d have to figure Arrieta would prefer to pitch for a team more likely to contend.

Dialogues are cool, though. You should go have one over lunch.