Chad Qualls says he's not injured, he's just bad

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I’m a big Adam Carolla fan and he often talks about how people who’re drunk or high inevitably claim to not be drunk or high when questioned about their bad behavior. His point is that they might as well admit to being under the influence of something, because otherwise that just means they have no excuse for acting like an idiot while totally sober.
I bring this up because after being stripped of closing duties Chad Qualls said yesterday that his massive struggles this season are not due to coming back from the ugly knee injury he suffered late last season or a new injury. So, like a drunk person insisting that their idiotic behavior came while completely sober, Qualls is saying his 8.46 ERA and .379 opponents’ batting average are simply the result of horrendous pitching.

I’ve never had to go through any kind of stint this long in my entire career. For the most part it’s been fairly easy for me to go out there and get the job done and all of a sudden I have to go over these hurdles. Sometimes the ball runs on me when I get the ball up in the zone, and that’s a reason a lot of guys are getting hits and getting the ball in the air. I just have to go back to getting my ground balls. It’s been a frustrating year. I know I’m better than this. It’ll turn up for me. I know it will. I’ve shown it in my past that I’m too good a pitcher for this to go on.

Taking a deeper look at some of his numbers, Qualls is indeed inducing about eight percent fewer ground balls than usual this season. His fastball velocity hasn’t declined from previous years, but he’s serving up line drives on a career-high 22.3 percent of his balls in play, which is a big part of the reason why his batting average on balls in play is an absolutely ridiculous .474. To put that in some context, his career mark is .305.
Those shockingly bad ball-in-play numbers aren’t even close to sustainable whether Qualls is healthy, injured, or has decided to pitch left-handed without anyone noticing. His season totals are going to be hideous, because you can’t wipe away giving up 26 runs in 22.1 innings, but assuming he’s truly not hurt Qualls is probably a lot closer to giving the Diamondbacks some non-disastrous innings as a middle reliever or setup man than most people think.

Nationals do not activate Bryce Harper for Monday’s game

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The Nationals were expected to activate outfielder Bryce Harper from the 10-day disabled list in advance of Monday’s series opener in Philadelphia, but they did not because Harper woke up with flulike symptoms, Jorge Castillo of the Washington Post reports. It doesn’t have anything to do with the knee injury which sent him to the DL last month or the ensuing rehab, he adds.

Rain had fallen in Washington, D.C. on August 12 ahead of the Nationals’ game against the Giants. Harper attempted to beat out a ground out to first base but slipped on the wet first base bag and was later diagnosed with a bone bruise in his left knee.

Harper was in the midst of a great season prior to the injury, perhaps one that would have led to an NL MVP Award. When he comes back, he’ll do what he can to pad his .326/.419/.614 slash line along with 29 home runs, 87 RBI, and 92 runs scored in 472 plate appearances. The Nationals are just concerned with getting him back in the flow of things in time for the playoffs. They have seven games remaining in the regular season.

Chris Archer on joining Bruce Maxwell’s protest: “I don’t think it would be the best thing to do for me at this time.”

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Rays pitcher Chris Archer doesn’t see himself joining Athletics catcher Bruce Maxwell‘s protest any time soon, Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY Sports reports. Archer said, “From the feedback that I’ve gotten from my teammates, I don’t think it would be the best thing to do for me, at this time. I agree with the message. I believe in equality.”

Archer continued, “I don’t want to offend anybody. No matter how you explain it or justify it, some people just can’t get past the military element of it and it’s not something I want to do, is ruffle my teammates’ feathers on my personal views that have nothing to do with baseball.”

Archer did express admiration for the way Maxwell handled his situation. The right-hander said, “The way he went about it was totally, I think, as respectful as possible, just letting everybody know that this doesn’t have anything to do with the military, first and foremost, noting that he has family members that are in the military. It’s a little bit tougher for baseball players to make that leap, but I think he was the right person to do it.”

Maxwell recently became the first baseball player to kneel as the national anthem was sung, a method of protest popularized by quarterback Colin Kaepernick. As Craig explained yesterday, baseball’s hierarchical culture has proven to be a strong deterrent for players to express their unpopular opinions. We can certainly see that in Archer’s justification. Archer was one of 62 African Americans on the Opening Day roster across 30 major league clubs (750 total players, 8.3%).