And That Happened: Monday's Scores and Highlights

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Earthquake.jpgJust four games, so not a lot happened. That is, unless you count an ally-oop home run, the best player in baseball having a ball bounce off his head and freakin’ earthquake interrupt the eighth inning as “not a lot.”

Blue Jays 6, Padres 3: Nothing notable here other than AN EARTHQUAKE IN
THE EIGHTH INNING. “They happen so fast that there’s nothing you can
do,” Cito Gaston said after the game.  Yeah, if they’d just slow down a bit
we’d be able to get over to the control panel which operates our
inertial dampeners, thereby mitigating the effects of the quake. Two
homers for John Buck, by the way. He’s from Wyoming and cowboys aren’t
afraid of earthquakes.

Giants 10, Orioles 2: For those keeping score at home, the 2010 Orioles
now have an identical record to the 1988 Orioles at the 64-game mark. 
Time to hire Frank Robinson?

Brewers 12, Angels 2: Casey McGehee had a home run, but only because Torii Hunter gave him an assist. Or maybe McGehee gets the assist and Hunter gets the points, because it was basically an ally-oop play. McGehee also took Erik Aybar out of the game with a breakup slide at second. Looked clean to me. The real problem there was the throw from Kevin Frandsen at first base, which required Aybar to reach back for the ball with his leg fully extended. I’m assuming Mike Scioscia had a problem with the throw too, considering that he took Frandsen out of the game immediately after that play.

Cardinals 9, Mariners 3: Rough day at the office for Albert Pujols too, as he took a throw off his head as he was scoring from third. Not that rough, however, as he reached base all five trips to the plate. Overall Tony La Russa’s rejiggered lineup — with Matt Holliday in the two-hole — scored nine runs. I’m sure it had everything to do with La Russa’s genius moves and nothing to do with the fact that the Cards were facing Luke French and Ian Snell.

Chris Woodward interviewed for the Yankees’ managerial position

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The Yankees interviewed Aaron Boone for their managerial vacancy on Friday, and today it was Chris Woodward’s turn. That makes at least five interviews since the offseason began, and Woodward’s likely won’t be the last.

Like fellow candidate Eric Wedge, whom the Yankees interviewed just last week, Woodward has never played or coached for the club. He spent the majority of his 12-year career with the Blue Jays and picked up brief stints with the Mets, Braves, Mariners and Red Sox before returning to Toronto for his final season in 2011. Following retirement, he served as the Mariners’ minor league infield coordinator and infield and first base coach from 2012-2015. During the 2015 offseason, he jumped over to the National League to work with the Dodgers as a third base coach, and saw his first postseason run since the Mets lost to the Dodgers in the 2006 NLDS.

While Woodward has yet to manage at the major league level, he was named manager of the New Zealand national team during the 2017 World Baseball Classic qualifiers. It’s certainly conceivable that the Yankees would prefer a candidate with significant experience leading a major league team, but right now the only person who fits that bill is Eric Wedge — and, well, it’s Eric Wedge.