Speculating on a Roy Oswalt-to-Texas deal

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Craig thinks the pieces are in places, but he doesn’t know what those pieces may be. So let’s speculate on some of the possibilities to be shipped from Texas to Houston in return for Roy Oswalt.
Too good to include:
Neftali Feliz (RHP – Age 22) – Feliz is 15-of-17 in save chances since replacing Frank Francisco in the closer’s role for the Rangers, and he’s been particularly good over the last six weeks, allowing runs in just two of 18 appearances. He has a ridiculous ceiling as a starting pitcher, as well, and he probably qualifies as one of the game’s 20 or 30 most valuable properties at the moment.
Justin Smoak (1B – Age 23) – Smoak has stepped up of late, hitting .317/.429/.537 so far in June to improve his overall line to .213/.328/.374 in 155 at-bats since he replaced Chris Davis as the Rangers’ first baseman. Since he’s contributing right now and he’s going to be a great bargain these next few years, the Rangers shouldn’t be willing to part with him.
Martin Perez (LHP – Age 19) – With a 5.32 ERA in 11 starts, Perez isn’t exactly dominating Texas League hitters. However, he just turned 19 a month ago and many of the guys he’s facing are three and four years older than he is. With a stellar fastball-curveball combination, he ranks as one of baseball’s best pitching prospects.
Tanner Scheppers (RHP – age 23) – Scheppers has missed some time of late with a hamstring injury, but he has a 1.32 ERA and a 48/10 K/BB ratio in 34 innings as a reliever between Double- and Triple-A. The big concern here is his history of shoulder problems. However, he currently appears poised to make the same kind of impact Feliz did last August. Also, t’d be problematic to deal him anyway. Since he signed late last year, he’s not eligible to be traded until mid-September.
More likely possibilities:
Michael Kirkland (LHP – Age 23) – If acquired, he’d be an obvious choice to step right into Oswalt’s rotation spot. The southpaw is 6-1 with a 3.17 ERA for Triple-A Oklahoma City. He’s been rather wild this year, walking 38 in 65 1/3 innings, but he has a legitimate low-90s fastball and a four-pitch arsenal that could make him a No. 3 starter.
Robbie Ross (LHP – Age 20) – Ross is a bit on the small side and he doesn’t have much of a changeup yet, but with his fastball-slider combo, he should be able to avoid a move to the pen. He’s allowed just one homer while amassing a 2.12 ERA and a 52/16 K/BB ratio in 76 1/3 innings for low Single-A Hickory this season.
Chris Davis (1B-3B – Age 24) – Davis hasn’t come close to matching his success from his rookie year in 2008 (.285/.331/.549 in 295 games), but he’s still just 24 and he still has 35-homer power. The Astros could pick him up and shift him back to third base, where he’s adequate defensively if a bit error-prone. Let him and Chris Johnson battle it out for a spot in the team’s future plans.
Jarrod Saltalamacchia (C – Age 25) – The Astros have their catcher of the future in 2008 first-rounder Jason Castro, but Salty could be a perfect buy-low candidate. He’s shown plenty of offensive potential in the past, and he hasn’t hit his prime seasons yet. Freed from the responsibilities of catching, his career might take off as a first baseman or left fielder. The Astros certainly need some bats with upside, and while Salty’s stock is well down, he qualifies.
Alexi Ogando (RHP – Age 26) – The Rangers just added the hard-throwing Ogando to their pen after he opened the season with a 2.05 ERA and a 42/11 K/BB ratio in 30 2/3 innings between Double- and Triple-A. His age is practically irrelevant, since he was one of the Texas prospects to miss four seasons because of his involvement in a human trafficking ring. He has the potential to turn into a closer down the line.
My guess is that it will take two from second group and then maybe a lesser name or two to get a deal done. The Rangers shouldn’t have to part with anyone from the top group unless they want the Astros to eat some salary in a trade.

Mitt Romney’s sons are trying to buy a stake in the Yankees

TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 30:  Tagg Romney son of Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney gives an interview during the final day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 30, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC which will conclude today.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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Mitt Romney built his professional life in Massachusetts and was once the governor of the state. As such, it is not surprising that he has long identified as a Red Sox fan. So this has to be troubling to him from a fan’s perspective. From Jon Heyman:

The Romney family is bidding to buy a small stake in the Yankees months after their try for the Marlins stalled. If the deal goes through, it is expected to be $25 million to $30 million per percentage point and thought to be interested in one or two percentage points. The Yankees are valued around $3 billion or more.

The effort is being led by Mitt’s son Tagg, one of his brothers and their business partners. Mitt’s spokesman tells Jon Heyman that he has nothing to do with it personally. Tagg Romney is reported to have been planning a bid for controlling interest in the Marlins, but that has fallen through.

I find this interesting insofar as the M.O. for the Steinbrenners has, for years, been to buy out minority shareholders in the Yankees, not seek more. Indeed, when George Steinbrenner bought the Yankees back in 1973 he held just a bare controlling interest and there were a ton of silent partners, most of which were back in Ohio and knew Steinbrenner from his shipping business. I’ve personally gotten to know some of them over the years as there are a handful of them in Columbus and I crossed paths with them in my legal career. They have almost all been bought out in the past couple of decades. They still get season tickets and World Series rings and stuff. You can tell them by their personalized Yankees plates and the fact that, within the first ten minutes of meeting them, they will tell you that they once owned a piece of the Yankees but got pushed out.

In light of all of that it’s interesting that the Steinbrenners are once again accepting bids for small stakes in the team. Especially from someone whose interest in controlling the Marlins suggests that they do not consider it to be a mere vanity investment. Makes me wonder what the Steinbrenners’ long term plans are.

Max Scherzer still can’t throw fastballs

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 13: Max Scherzer #31 of the Washington Nationals works against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the fifth inning during game five of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 13, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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The Nationals will be many people’s favorites in the NL East this season. Not everything is looking great, however. For example, their ace — defending NL Cy Young winner Max Scherzer — can’t even throw fastballs right now.

The reason: the stress fracture he suffered last August is still causing him problems and Scherzer is unable to use his fastball grip without feeling pain in his right ring finger. He will throw a bullpen session tomorrow, but will only use his secondary stuff.

Scherzer has not been ruled out for Opening Day — the fact that he is throwing some means that his timetable isn’t totally on hold — but you have to figure, at some point, not being able to air things out and use his heater will lead to some problems in his spring training routine.