Oswalt's no-trade clause is becoming meaningless

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roy oswalt headshot astros.jpgIn the past couple of weeks we’ve heard Roy Oswalt say that he’d waive his no-trade clause to go “an organization that wants to win.”  They all want to win, of course, so that doesn’t say much. Neither, really, does Oswalt fielding questions about specific teams.  Oswalt is a nice young southern gentleman, so I’m sure he was taught that it was rude to disparage people in public. The Nats? Sure, why not. The Yankees? Can’t rule it out!  How about the Mets?

A player who is friendly with Roy Oswalt says
the Astros right-hander would “definitely” accept a trade to the Mets
if they remain in the playoff hunt. But the fact Oswalt is
still owed about $30 million through 2011 makes it extremely unlikely
the Mets would pursue him. The player who is friendly with
Oswalt said the right-hander likes the veteran fiber of the Mets.

Oswalt was long thought to prefer the National League and smaller cities closer to his offseason home down south. Now that he’s said OK to the Mets, the Yankees and the Nationals — more or less — none of that seems to apply. Or maybe he’s just saying that, yes, hypothetically he’d accept anything.  It seems, though, that the more reports like this we hear, the less meaningful they truly are.

The Tigers decline Anibal Sanchez’s 2018 option

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From the “this does not surprise us in the very least” department, Tigers GM Al Avila announced today that the club is declining its $16 million option on right-hander Anibal Sanchez.

Sanchez had a terrible year in 2017, going 3-7 with a 6.41 ERA in 2017. That’s a long slide down from his 2013 season, in which he won the AL ERA title, going 14-8 and posting an ERA of 2.57 in the first year of his five-year, $80 million deal. Since then he’s gone 28-35 with a 5.15 ERA. He never started 30 games or more over the course of the contract.

The declination of the option does come with a nice parting gift for Sanchez: a $5 million buyout. Which is pretty dang high for a buyout, but that’s how the Tigers rolled three or four years ago.