An Unwritten Rules Moment: Beckham's bunt attempt in the eighth

6 Comments

Ted Lilly pitching.jpgI realize that some of you were watching the Tony Awards, the NBA Finals and other things that don’t really matter all that much, but the smart ones among you were watching the Cubs-White Sox game. If you did, you watched a pretty damn spiffy pitching matchup, with Ted Lilly and Gavin Floyd matching no-hit bids until late in the game.

Lilly still had his going in the eighth when White Sox’ second baseman Gordon Beckham tried to lay down a bunt to break it up. This did not sit well with the fans in Wrigley, who booed the attempt, most likely because they perceived it as a violation of baseball’s unwritten rules. Or maybe they were just booing the fact that Old Style sales were cut off. You never can tell with a Wrigley crowd.  Either way, Ozzie Guillen weighed in on it all:

“You bunt in the ninth, that’s unprofessional. But the
eighth, Wrigley Field people; the only thing they can do is boo. They
boo for every freakin thing here.”

The Cubs fans were ridiculous to boo, but I’d argue even with Ozzie on this point: in a 1-0 game you can bunt whenever the hell you want if you think it’s your best chance to get on base. I mean, sure, we can talk what’s bush league and what isn’t if the score is 6-0, but in a close game on a rainy night, when the pitcher is starting to think more about his impending accomplishment? Damn skippy I’m asking a speedy player to lay down a bunt if he thinks he can reach on it.

Of course, I’d also be curious to hear what Guillen would say if the situation was reversed and Starlin Castro was laying one down on Floyd. Something tells me he’d take issue with it, and that he wouldn’t confine his adjectives to the word “freakin’.”

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

Getty Images
1 Comment

Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.