Tabata, Lincoln debut for the Pirates

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brad lincoln and jose tabata pirates.JPGThe Pirates had a front row seat to the debut of the Nationals savior on Tuesday, but last night it was Pittsburgh’s turn, with Brad Lincoln and Jose Tabata taking their opening bows.

Lincoln had much promise when he was drafted, but one Tommy John surgery and a few years later he’s a 25 year-old rookie who doesn’t project to be a top-of-the-rotation pitcher. Not that being a middle-of-the-rotation guy is not valuable, of course. You gotta have those types of guys too, so he could definitely be a key part of the next good Pirates team.  As for his performance: He have up five earned runs on seven hits over six innings, striking out three and walking two. Meh, sure, but as we noted all over the place yesterday, baseball history is rotten with good pitchers who had less-than-stellar debuts.

As Aaron mentioned yesterday, Tabata has suffered a similar decline in his stock, but at age 21 he still has a lot of time to become a major contributor. His night was better: he went 2 for 4 out of the leadoff spot with two singles, a walk and a stolen base. Only downer: he had to leave the game in the eighth when his hammy started to cramp up.

The next big glimpse into the Pirates future: Pedro Alvarez.  He’s raking down at Indianapolis — he had three hits and two RBIs yesterday and leads the team with 12 homers and 50 RBIs — and I would expect that the Pirates will call him up sometime soon.

It may not feel like it sometimes, but there’s hope in Pittsburgh.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.