The Pirates should not go down without a fight

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This post over at the Pirates’ blog WHYGAVS is being rewtweed and reposted all over the Internet today because of a brilliant “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” riff on the whole Stephen Strasburg debut. And it is brilliant, so go check it out.  But I like it much more for this passage from its author, Pat Lackey:

This is the most anyone besides Pirate fans will notice the Pirates all year. The Pirates are currently the national afterthought, the joke of a team that’s been sacrificed to the debut of the most hyped pitching prospect in the history of baseball. No one expects the Pirates to do anything in this game besides strike out nine or ten times, go back to the locker room with their heads between their tails, and give the huge assembled scores of media some nice quotes about how awesome Strasburg is.

And that’s all people should expect from the Pirates tonight. But no one wants to be a sacrificial lamb, and there’s going to be a lot of pride on the line for the guys in black and gold tonight. I sure as hell hope they go down with a fight.

Baseball is a team sport with a tough freakin’ learning curve.  As I said this morning, I wish nothing but the best for Stephen Strasburg and I hope he has a great career. But at the same time, I wouldn’t mind it in the least if the Pirates — who are drawing comparisons to the Washington Generals for cryin’ out loud — lay the lumber to the kid a little bit to remind everyone that baseball is not best defined by huge, media-crazy moments like tonight’s game.  It’s a game defined by the daily grind, stamina, perseverance and learning from one’s mistakes.

Go Strasburg, but go Pirates too.

Cardinals walk off on controversial double by Yadier Molina

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 15:  Yadier Molina #4 of the St. Louis Cardinals reacts after he was called out on strike against the San Francisco Giants in the top of the six inning at AT&T Park on September 15, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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Update (11:09 PM EDT):

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From unlucky to lucky, the Cardinals maintained their position in the National League Wild Card race with walk-off victory over the Reds on Thursday night.

The Cardinals went into the top of the ninth with a 3-2 lead over the Reds, but saw the game tied when Scott Schebler dribbled a two-strike, two out ground ball down the third base line. It seemed as if the baseball gods had turned their backs on the Cardinals.

In the bottom of the ninth against reliever Blake Wood, Matt Carpenter drew a one-out walk. Randal Grichuk then struck out, leaving all of the Cardinals’ hopes on Yadier Molina. Molina went ahead 2-0 in the count, then ripped a 95 MPH fastball to left field. The ball bounced high and over the left field fence for what seemed like an obvious ground-rule double. Carpenter motored around third base and scored the winning run.

The Cardinals poured onto the field in celebration and the umpires walked off the field. Manager Bryan Price wanted to have the play reviewed, but when he went onto the field, the umpires were nowhere to be found. Price chased after them but to no avail. As the Cardinals left the field and the stadium emptied, the Reds remained in the dugout. The Reds’ relievers were left in a bit of purgatory, standing aimlessly in left field after exiting the bullpen. Finally, the game was announced as complete over the P.A. system at Busch Stadium. The results are great if you’re a Cardinals fan, but terrible if you’re a Mets or Giants fan.

As Jon Morosi points out, the rules clearly state that the signage above the fence in left field is out of the field of play. The umpires got it wrong.

Price, however, also took too long to speak to the umpires. Per Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

If this happened between two teams playing a meaningless game, it would’ve been a lot easier to swallow, but Thursday’s Reds-Cardinals game had implications on not only the Cardinals’ future, but the Mets’ and Giants’ as well.

Freddie Freeman’s hitting streak ends at 30 games

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 28:  First baseman Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves hits a single in the sixth inning to extend his hitting streak to 30 games during the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Turner Field on September 28, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
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Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman went 0-for-4 during Thursday’s win against the Phillies, snapping his hitting streak at 30 games. It marked the longest hitting streak of the 2016 season. Freeman’s streak of 46 consecutive games reaching base safely ended as well.

The longest hitting streak in Atlanta Braves history belongs to Dan Uggla, who hit in 33 consecutive games in 2011. Tommy Holmes hit in 37 straight for the Boston Braves in 1945.

During his hitting streak, Freeman hit .384/.485/.670 with 11 doubles, seven home runs, 27 RBI, and 26 runs scored in 136 plate appearances. That padded what were already very strong numbers on the season. After Thursday’s game, Freeman is overall batting .306/.404/.572 with 33 home runs, 88 RBI< and 101 runs scored in 677 plate appearances.