And That Happened: Monday's Scores and Highlights

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Mike Krukow.jpgGiants 6, Reds 5: Jose Juan Uribe gave the Giants a 4-1 lead with a two-run single in the third and their 6-5 lead with a two-run single in the seventh. Your moment of random, from the game story: “A man wearing a Mike Krukow Giants jersey and waving a ‘Go Buster’ sign
dived over a row of seats to get a foul ball hit by Posey in the second
inning.”  Question: did he buy the Krukow jersey off the rack in 1986 or did he spend good money to have a custom one made more recently? Because God knows you can’t just run down to Dick’s Sporting Goods and find a Mike Krukow jersey these days. Well, at least outside of the imaginary world I’ve created known to me as “Kickassville, U.S.A.”

Padres 3, Phillies 1: Cole Hamels had a no-no into the seventh inning, but it didn’t hold up. And given how these Phillies bats are hitting these days, it damn nigh would have had to in order to give them the win. Two homers for Adrian Gonzalez. The Phillies haven’t had two home runs in a game since May 21st.

Cubs 6, Pirates 1: I hit this one up yesterday. Not known at the time: Silva was pitching this game with the stomach flu, which necessitated several trips to the restroom during the game. The Pirates, in contrast, could not get any runs.

Angels 4, Athletics 2: The Angels win their sixth straight and take over first place. As I said in the Power Rankings last week, in the future, every team will be in first place in the AL West for 15 minutes.

Mariners 4, Rangers 2: Cliff Lee is pretty ridiculously good (CG, 7 H, 2 ER, 7K). Indeed he’s so good that the fact that there is a decent chance that he’ll be playing for his fourth team in the space of a calendar year sometime soon is one of those things about which historians will one day write long, heavily footnoted articles.

Red Sox 4, Indians 1: A surprisingly aggressive Dice-K throws eight shutout innings.  Manny Acta on his starter, Fausto Carmona, who gave out six free passes in six innings: “I thought Fausto did well despite all the walks.” Kind of reminds me of that Marion Barry quote about how the D.C. crime rate wasn’t too bad despite all the killings.

Rockies 5, Astros 1: Jason Hammel and Dice-K are going to get together and do a seminar on how to pitch against terrible lineups without breaking a sweat. Seven and a third shutout innings for Hammel vs. the Astros.

Diamondbacks 7, Braves 4: Anything is possible against the Diamondbacks’ bullpen, but there are some holes too large to climb out of, and Derek Lowe dug one last night for Atlanta. Lowe, after totally handcuffing the Phillies last week, gave up seven runs and eight hits in four innings. Blah.

Dodgers 12, Cardinals 4: Blake DeWitt hit a homer and drove in five as the Dodgers win in a laugher. Of course if the Dodgers were actually seen laughing during the game it would have been an unwritten rules violation and their players would be subject to plunkings going forward. So no, maybe it was more of an “I’m smiling on the inside” kind of game.

Pete Rose wrote a letter to the Hall of Fame, pleading to be placed on the ballot

Former Cincinnati Reds player and manager Pete Rose poses while taping a segment for Miami Television News on the campus of Miami University, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015, in Oxford, Ohio. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)
Associated Press
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Tim Brown of Yahoo has obtained a letter written by Pete Rose — well, written by his attorney — to the Baseball Hall of Fame, pleading to be placed on the ballot so he could be considered for induction by the BBWAA.

The upshot of the argument is that when Rose accepted his permanent ban from baseball, it did not include a ban from Hall of Fame consideration. Which, yes, is true. But it’s also true that soon after the ban, the Hall of Fame — which is a private institution, not owned by Major League Baseball — decided to change its rules and only allow those who are not banned by baseball to be on its ballot. That rule, 3(e), was enacted in February 1991.

Which is itself a tad disingenuous, as it’s long been clear that the Hall of Fame and Major League Baseball pretty much see the world the same way. The Commissioner and his close confidants are on the board of the Hall for cryin’ out loud. I have no doubt whatsoever that, if Major League Baseball wanted something of the Hall of Fame, it could get it and that if the Hall of Fame did something Major League Baseball did not like, MLB would make its displeasure known to the Hall and the matter would be remedied.

Which is to say that, yes, Rose probably has a good point or two in all of this and it would be interesting to know how the Hall came to adopt its “no banned players can be considered” rule and why and whether it had anything to do with MLB suggesting that the Hall do via its rules what MLB might not have gotten Rose to agree to in its own right.

But just because something is “interesting” does not make it meaningful. The Hall is a private business that can do what it wants. Major League Baseball is a private business that can do what it wants. There is no legal right to be eligible for the Hall of Fame and, even if Rose had some sort of legal theory — Fraud, maybe? Some sort of interference with economic opportunity claim? — it was one that should’ve been brought decades ago. And no, I don’t think he’d have a legal leg to stand on even if he had.

All that being said, I think Pete Rose should be in the Hall of Fame. I think that his playing career makes him more than worthy and his transgressions, while serious enough to keep him out of the game for life, should not stop a museum and the baseball establishment from honoring what he did between 50 and 30 years ago.

His letter won’t work, though. Because the same folks who decided he was not worthy of reinstatement last year have a lot of influence on the folks who determine who gets placed on a Hall of Fame balance. In asking for what he’s asking, Rose is asking for one of those parties to go against the other. And that has never, ever happened.

Settling the Scores: Tuesday’s results

NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27:  Gary Sanchez #24 of the New York Yankees celebrates his first inning two-run home run against the Boston Red Sox with teammate Jacoby Ellsbury #22 at Yankee Stadium on September 27, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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The Sox’ winning streak ends at 11, thanks in part to Gary Sanchez continuing to hit like Barry Bonds or someone. Well, not quite Bonds, but his 20 homers in 49 games is ridiculous. I’d say “at some point pitchers need to stop giving him stuff to hit,” but this dude drove in a run when someone tried to intentionally walk him a week or two ago, so maybe there is nothing that can be done. In any event, Boston’s loss, along with the Blue Jays win, means that the AL East is not quite settled. It likely is practically, but not technically!

In other news, the Tigers pounded the Indians and their post-clinch, hungover lineup and, with the Orioles’ loss, pull a game closer in the Wild Card. The Mets pounded the Marlins who, one suspects, can only run on emotion so long and desperately want and ned to be with their loved ones to process this past week. The Cards and Giants both won as well, keeping the NL Wild Card at the status quo for another day: the Mets and Giants in, if the season ended today, the Cards one back.

The scores:

Yankees 6, Red Sox 4
Nationals 4, Diamondbacks 2
Cubs 6, Pirates 4
Blue Jays 5, Orioles 1
Tigers 12, Indians 0
Braves 7, Phillies 6
Mets 12, Marlins 1
Royals 4, Twins 3
Rangers 6, Brewers 4
White Sox 13, Rays 6
Astros 8, Mariners 4
Cardinals 12, Reds 5
Angels 8, Athletics 1
Padres 7, Dodgers 1
Giants 12, Rockies 3