Should the Phillies release Raul Ibanez?

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Raul Ibanez headshot.jpgThat’s what Corey Seidman at Phillies Nation thinks:

From a baseball standpoint – and from a logical standpoint –  there is
no reason Raul Ibanez deserves to play everyday on a contending team. He
has been awful at the plate and terrible in the field. Yet he continues
to bat sixth everyday while the Phillies top prospect, who also happens
to be a corner outfielder, is putting on a clinic in the
pitcher-friendly Eastern League.

That prospect is Domonic Brown, the fellow who I said had his nose pressed up against the glass a couple of posts ago.  He’s raking in AA: 313/.382/.587 with 10 homers and 33 RBI.  Meanwhile Ibanez cruises on the strength of his April and May of 2009. As Seidman demonstrates, he’s done nothing since. Certainly nothing to justify his job.

Which was easy to hide when Chase Utley and Jayson Werth were hitting and Jimmy Rollins was healthy and productive at shortstop.  With those things not happening, Ibanez has been exposed as the weak link on the defending NL champs.

As of tomorrow evening, the Braves, Mets, Marlins and Nationals will all have called up and played their phenoms.  Perhaps its time for the Phillies to do the same.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.