Quote of the Day: The Daily News' Bill Madden hates replay; modernity

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Baseball has become dehumanized enough by sabermetricians and their
mind-numbing statistical analyses and it doesn’t need to be made more
complicated by having the potential for instant replay on every play.

Bill Madden of the New York Daily News, seemingly channeling his frustration over never figuring out how to get his VCR to stop flashing “12:00” for the last 30 years.

Of course, the “complicated” replay system he envisions involves managers challenging calls on the field, which is downright footballian in its base crudity.

As I’ve counseled many times before, the way to implement replay is to stick an ump in the booth with a walkie-talkie and allow him to confer with the other umps when obvious mistakes occur, when close calls are argued and the like.  Basically, his input would be an extension of an umpires’ on-the-field conference, utilized in exactly the same way.

Would their be hiccups? Sure. But it’s the least intrusive means of implementing instant replay.

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.