What They're Saying About Ken Griffey's retirement

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Griffey hat on backwards.jpgI like eulogies — for careers and lives — that are a little on the brutally yet respectfully honest side. Outside of Rob Neyer — who always delivers at times like these — I’m not guessing we’ll get a ton of that when it comes to the Kid, but I can live with it.  Here’s what people are saying thus far:

  • Rob Neyer: “He was a great player. No question about that. But for many years, he
    wasn’t quite the player people thought he was, or was supposed
    to be. In retrospect, did Griffey really deserve his spot on the
    All-Century Team? Did he really deserve to win 10 Gold Glove Awards? Did
    he really save baseball in Seattle? Tomorrow, it will be said
    that Griffey was the best player of his era who didn’t use steroids. Was
    he really, though? . . . Maybe he wasn’t as good as he could have been. But he was better than
    almost everyone else.”
  • Lookout Landing: “Ken Griffey Junior is why I am a baseball fan. As kids growing up, we
    all have potential. They tell us we are the future. Those of us who were
    baseball fans in Seattle in the late 80s and early 90s were also
    watching the future unfold before us on the diamond . . . He was out there playing the game and having fun,
    doing things adults never thought possible, perhaps just because he
    didn’t know it was impossible in the first place.
  • U.S.S. Mariner: Did he stick around too long? Yes, of course. But the slide may keep
    some fans from remembering just how amazing Griffey was in the mid-90s . . . he made baseball here an absolute joy to watch for many years, and
    that’s enough for me.
  • Larry Stone, Seattle Times: “[W]e will all remember a player who at his best provided a combination of
    youthful exuberance and epic skill that made him a bonafide legend.”
  • OMG Reds: “It will probably take a while to sink in, but I’m sure a lot of us feel
    that a piece of our childhood is now gone.”

I presume that more big name mainstream columnists will come online later to weigh in. The stuff I hope they stay away from, but which I doubt they will, is the dead-certain view that Ken Griffey Jr. “played clean” or whatever. I hate that narrative.

Why? Partially because we have no way of knowing if it was true. But mostly because it makes him out to be some sort of special case.  Griffey was one of the best players ever. Not just one of the best “clean” players ever.  Let’s just celebrate him for what he was and is, not as some tool of triangulation steroid politics.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.