What They're Saying About Ken Griffey's retirement

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Griffey hat on backwards.jpgI like eulogies — for careers and lives — that are a little on the brutally yet respectfully honest side. Outside of Rob Neyer — who always delivers at times like these — I’m not guessing we’ll get a ton of that when it comes to the Kid, but I can live with it.  Here’s what people are saying thus far:

  • Rob Neyer: “He was a great player. No question about that. But for many years, he
    wasn’t quite the player people thought he was, or was supposed
    to be. In retrospect, did Griffey really deserve his spot on the
    All-Century Team? Did he really deserve to win 10 Gold Glove Awards? Did
    he really save baseball in Seattle? Tomorrow, it will be said
    that Griffey was the best player of his era who didn’t use steroids. Was
    he really, though? . . . Maybe he wasn’t as good as he could have been. But he was better than
    almost everyone else.”
  • Lookout Landing: “Ken Griffey Junior is why I am a baseball fan. As kids growing up, we
    all have potential. They tell us we are the future. Those of us who were
    baseball fans in Seattle in the late 80s and early 90s were also
    watching the future unfold before us on the diamond . . . He was out there playing the game and having fun,
    doing things adults never thought possible, perhaps just because he
    didn’t know it was impossible in the first place.
  • U.S.S. Mariner: Did he stick around too long? Yes, of course. But the slide may keep
    some fans from remembering just how amazing Griffey was in the mid-90s . . . he made baseball here an absolute joy to watch for many years, and
    that’s enough for me.
  • Larry Stone, Seattle Times: “[W]e will all remember a player who at his best provided a combination of
    youthful exuberance and epic skill that made him a bonafide legend.”
  • OMG Reds: “It will probably take a while to sink in, but I’m sure a lot of us feel
    that a piece of our childhood is now gone.”

I presume that more big name mainstream columnists will come online later to weigh in. The stuff I hope they stay away from, but which I doubt they will, is the dead-certain view that Ken Griffey Jr. “played clean” or whatever. I hate that narrative.

Why? Partially because we have no way of knowing if it was true. But mostly because it makes him out to be some sort of special case.  Griffey was one of the best players ever. Not just one of the best “clean” players ever.  Let’s just celebrate him for what he was and is, not as some tool of triangulation steroid politics.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.